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Measuring Server's processing rate with a simple powershell command.

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Measuring Server's processing rate with a simple powershell command. The differences in processing rate also was recorded in different use-cases, when a server in free and busy states.

My Boss keep complaining about the speed of VMs but that was just his feeling, no any clear clue or quantitative figures. Therefore I did some research on the Internet and found this powershell command to measure the speed of Server/PC. Its method is just measuring the time to complete a specific task. Here we are:


Measure-Command { for($i=1; $i -le 10; $i++) {echo "Hello"} }



or you can filter the result with "find" parameter:

Measure-Command { for($i=1; $i -le 10; $i++) {echo "Hello"} } | find "TotalMilliseconds :"


Do you want some more for statistic? Just add a loop:

for($n=1; $n -le 10; $n++) { Measure-Command { for($i=1; $i -le 10; $i++) {echo "Hello"} } | find "TotalMilliseconds :" }


Based on the suggestion of an admin, I added a use case here. First of all this is the resource (CPU, RAM, Disk) of my laptop:


This was the result of command in normal state:


And here was the result after I turned on an VM of ESXi 6.5 (11 GB RAM, 4 vCPU), NAS XPEnology (5 GB RAM, 4 vCPU), some BIG excel files (about 60-70 MB), a MP3 audio of 2 hours:




When I turned off these VMs, the results even was higher, due to the usage of CPU, ...


... Disk,...


or Memory

So, we did see the differences of CPU speed in difference circumstances, when a laptop in normal and busy states.


I knew it is just a simple command, but I want to share this to all of you, especially the new comers ^_^

Happy reading!

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