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Apple EULA :- running OS X on Non Apple Hardware ? What is the EE (Company) Response ?

here are the links to the EULAs

http://www.apple.com/legal/sla/

This discussion comes up again and again, in the VMware Zone, How do I run OS X on my Windows PC using VMware Workstation, Player or VMware vSphere ?

from this EULA

http://images.apple.com/legal/sla/docs/OSX1010.pdf

2. Permitted License Uses and Restrictions.

A. Preinstalled and Single-Copy Apple Software License. Subject to the terms and conditions of this
License, unless you obtained the Apple Software from the Mac App Store or under a volume license,
maintenance or other written agreement from Apple, you are granted a limited, non-exclusive license to
install, use and run one (1) copy of the Apple Software on a single Apple-branded computer at any one.


In the five years I've been answering questions, I was always led to believe, this was a forbidden topic, for Experts to provide any assistance, to help an Asker in a Question, to get OS X running on non Apple hardware, because it was a breach of the Apple EULA, and therefore breaks, or infringes the EE Terms and Conditions.

So what is the EE "Company response", because in a recent question, arguments, for and against came up again, with the same Experts. It also seems it's depending on which country, EULA could be different, (I've not researched this!)

Comments have been deleted, but you'll be able to read them in a badger....

http://www.experts-exchange.com/questions/28710521/How-to-move-vm-in-WMWARE-Fusion-from-Mac-to-WMWARE-Workstation-in-Windows.html#a40959482

Andy
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Rank: Prodigy

Expert Comment

If you don't like the terms, you may negotiate them.  You do not always have to blindly accept the given terms.  Your choice isn't just the choice of which software you may purchase or license.  You can negotiate license terms.  (e.g. South Korea and Microsoft, SAP or Oracle contracts, etc...)

  I'd like to see you go to Microsoft and say that you want to negotiate the terms of their software licenses.  Maybe the price, but the license?  No way.

  Instead of getting EE to change, maybe a better approach would be to go to Apple and ask them to allow their software to run on non-branded Apple products.

Jim.
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Rank: Genius

Expert Comment

serialband2015-09-08 09:11 AMID: 1753405
I'd like to see you go to Microsoft and say that you want to negotiate the terms of their software licenses.  Maybe the price, but the license?  No way.
If you're a large enough entity, you can negotiate terms.  South Korea and other large entities did and that's why there's still existing paid support for XP.  Previously, Microsoft completely dropped any and all support of older software.  Obviously, enough customers got Microsoft to change their terms of support.  Pricing and licensing are part of the deal.

Instead of getting EE to change, maybe a better approach would be to go to Apple and ask them to allow their software to run on non-branded Apple products.
Are you basically telling me to give up?  Basically, a "Go complain somewhere else"?
Why must I do either, or?  Also, it's not necessary to negotiate the older Apple OS that came on DVDs.  Those can legally be installed on non-Apple hardware.  There's nothing illegal about doing that personally.  You just can't sell them, nor distribute them, but it doesn't prevent me from doing it on my own systems and showing other people I've done it.  You certainly won't get support from Apple, but it's not illegal.  Those are still on older shrink wrapped licenses that still can't override your existing legal rights.  The only ones that can't be legally done are the newer Apple OS that have the stricter licenses and, so far, only applies definitively in the 9th Circuit Court District of the USA.  The EFF will also continue to fight that as soon as another case in a different district challenges it again.  If nobody ever brings up an issue, then nothing changes.
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Rank: Master

Expert Comment

Gene Richardson2015-09-09 08:05 AMID: 1753573
One of our main goals for Experts Exchange is to improve our reputation in the industry.  In order to do so, we cannot provide a forum that supports the discussion of activities that violate a third party company's licensing agreement or Terms of Use, as well as our own.  If there are violations of our Terms of Use and/or a third party‚Äôs, I would ask the moderators to address the issue appropriately.  If anyone has any questions, please feel free to reach out to me via email at grichardson@experts-exchange.com or call me at 805-787-0603x297.

Gene Richardson
COO, Experts Exchange
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Rank: Genius

Expert Comment

serialband2015-09-09 12:40 PMID: 1753619
Thank you for responding to the discussion about the EULA.  I will abide by your decision, but I wholly disagree with it.  I believe this censorship of legal rights is a part of the reason why EE is not as popular as other forums out there.  It will certainly reduce my participation on these topics.  I will have to spend more of my time elsewhere for that.

I now know that this is one place that we can't discuss our right to tinker with or repair software or hardware that we own, because of EULAs, even if they can't supersede our rights of ownership.  The Wall street Journal fully echoes my concerns about the issue and I was hoping that EE would lead in helping consumers instead of following the lead of corporations attempting to erode consumer rights.
http://www.wsj.com/articles/we-need-the-right-to-repair-our-gadgets-1441737868

Thank you.
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Rank: Genius

Expert Comment

serialband2015-10-01 11:00 AMID: 1770122
Here's an update to what I mean.  http://www.networkworld.com/article/2988060/smartphones/apple-gives-ifixit-app-the-boot.html

iFixit has the right to take apart the Apple TV and I fully support their cause.  Apple also has a right to close out their account for violating their license terms, but nothing done by iFixit was illegal.  This was my point to from the beginning.  It was a basic license contract dispute, not a criminal act.  If you think it's a criminal act, then you don't know the law and you are willingly and mistakenly giving up your legal rights.  All Apple can do, as a private company, is close their account, but I can still disagree with them for that.  It also makes me dislike Apple more.
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serialband2015-10-18 04:09 PMID: 1780394
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