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built in fiddles?

I'd love to see some built in fiddles (akin to jsfiddle or sqlfiddle) for helping answer questions that involve code. For example, if someone has a problem with javascript, I"d like the question to be a bit more formalized. Something like this:

This is the code i have: xxxx
This is what I want it to do: xxxx

That way, it encourages the users to ask more meaningful questions
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Rob2014-11-29 04:46 PMID: 136361
I agree, but how do you show/prove that?  First thing that comes to mind is stats on how often a "bin" is used in solution.

Also I'd like to explore how it benefit actually benefits EE.  You've said increases the standing of EE but we've all got our own flavour of bin at the moment (i predominantly use jsbin.com) so why would we use EE's one? rather than say what already exists and where I've got my code samples already?

A second point worth exploring, is how can EE can leverage hosting it's own "fiddles"?  What's going to make me use theirs versus something like jsbin (that retains your bins forever - so they say)
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Scott Fell2014-11-29 08:23 PMID: 136367
There are 2 items.  Bins/Fiddles and then the virtual machine idea.  

I don't think it is worth reinventing the wheel.  You can host jsbin on your own server, then integrate to your site.   The benefit is EE controls that data.  No bad links going down.  Also becomes a tool for others to use and link back ultimately to EE from outside of EE.  That has SEO implications.   Why would the Expert want to use it?  It is integrated with the question.  Multiple Experts can version from the same question.  With jsbin, you can work on a bin simultaneously.   It could be part of the Web Dev question UI.

With the virtual  machine idea, I just came across https://www.nitrous.io/. I'm sure if I looked more, there are others.  This seems to be something that is growing as is all in one hosted app development.  These systems are taking the opposite approach.  Work on your project in that ecosystem, if you have questions, ask the community of that ecosystem.  

In those virtual machine scenarios, people are paying for something they can touch and feel.  I find most people find it much easier to pay for something tangible than to pay for an idea.  There are 500K users of koding.com where some percentage are paying.  They are paying for the use of the always on VM and getting community help.  

Right now, every other developer project uses SO as the place to get community answers.   Maybe today the lions share of questions go to a QA site like EE, SO or Spiceworks.  But in the very near future, will web/mobile/device development questions all be serviced by the ecosystems created by the likes of a koding or stand alone options like SO/EE.  

I'm not an IT Pro although many times my clients assume that I am.  But if that was my main business, I find what Spiceworks does interesting.  They have apps built around managing your IT business with help desk software and other apps.  They have created multiple reasons to stay connected with that site.

Keeping my WebDev blinders on, that is why I think it is important to get going with these types of apps that enhance what we do.  Embedded fiddles/bins that can be seen by the outside (or kept private), allow multiple experts in the thread to build off the same bin without going outside EE.  The ability to test or develop on a hosted virtual machine like Koding.  I would also use apps like the IT helpdesk, a kanban board.  

Having a group of apps that I use on a daily basis under one roof may keep somebody connected to the site longer.  The Q/A aspect grows because there are more users due to these apps. The Q/A portion could even be the smaller part of the site.

I have played around with koding and I find it easy to use and am seriously looking at paying for it as a collaborative development service.   I would rather be able to do that here though.
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Scott Fell2014-11-29 08:25 PMID: 136368
p.s.  you can white label https://www.sysaid.com and quickly have an EE help desk app
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Rob2014-11-29 09:15 PMID: 136372
Amazing stuff Scott!  The SEO would probably be enough to sell it to EE TPTB at the moment *laughing* but seriously that's a huge point as SEO is so critical to EE as a business.

Not sure about all the experts working on the same code within a question if only because of the way the points system works.   I'm sure we;d agree that we'd build a better community by working together but that seems to work against the point system as it now stands.  Certainly assisted solutions help but there's also those (that shall remain nameless) that like low hanging fruit along with repeating what others have already said
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PortletPaul2014-11-29 10:04 PMID: 136377
>>"Anyone with a modicum of web programming could set this up in an hour"
if it was just about javascript  maybe that would be true

I have no personal interest is a jsfiddle alternative, but I'm sure others would
I do have a definite desire for a reliable sqlfiddle.com alternative;
one that supports multiple rdbms platforms (e.g. MySQL, Oracle, MS SQL, PostgreSQL)

That is not a one hour task in my opinion. (Although sqlfiddle's author has made that code open source.)
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Gary2014-11-30 07:16 AMID: 136398
Even something like sqlfiddle wouldn't be an enormous task.
At the basic level each fiddle is just a temporary table, with the sql stored and only executed when the fiddle is visited.
But this would require more setup at the server than a jsfiddle (if they didn't want to use the open source code, but why wouldn't they?)
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