This is a recent tech related issue that happened to someone I know.  A scam unfortunately and the hacker took advantage of a very fragile situation too.  Its amazing at what lengths hackers will go to take advantage of a person during their plight.

A friend of mine lost their dog so they made a post on Facebook about that and if anyone could help them find their missing dog.  They put their email and phone number out there in that post.  Their post was shared numerous times.  A few weeks went by and someone contacted them saying they found their dog.  My friend was very excited to hear the news and asked how they can get in touch.  The person said they need to verify my friend really owns the dog and asked them for the security code that was just sent to their phone.  Not thinking of anything other than having a chance to see their loyal friend again, they provided the security code that was sent to their phone to this stranger.

Boom.  Their email was hacked.

Guard your phone number and email folks.  Facebook is a new way to spread the word and get some traction for things we need urgency on, but displaying private information publicly, even in dire situations, can bite you in the butt.  Even if a person who is friends with you on Facebook prods for private information you have to guard yourself and consider if they've even been hacked and someone is posing as them.

It happens and it sucks.  Many of us here probably wouldn't fall for something like this, but we're all human.  We can also pass things like this on to our friends who are not in the technical world like us.  If you see something like this happen simply just direct message that person and recommend they remove their private information and just request anyone to contact them via private message, not on a public or 'private' facebook post.
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LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:Alan
Sorry to hear that.   I had a similar thing happen to a customer, where they were called by their bank and told their bank card had been reported stolen.  They said no, they had not reported it stolen (but did not check their wallet right then), at which point the bank rep said they had to assume they were talking to someone else, so please prove your ID by giving their PIN number.

Customer hung up thankfully.

What I'm not sure of, is what use the PIN number would be without the physical card?

Alan.
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LVL 53

Expert Comment

by:Jackie Man
The person said they need to verify my friend really owns the dog and asked them for the security code that was just sent to their phone.

It is a weirdest request for a scam just like asking the PIN of your bank ATM card.
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LVL 26

Expert Comment

by:Brian B
what use the PIN number would be without the physical card?

Scammers probably already have the card number. It is possible to make a new card, so once they have the PIN they can do whatever they want just like they had the real card. Fortunately the new chip enabled cars make this scam more difficult.
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LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:Nichole LaRue
Please verify it's your dog:

"What color is your dog?" Brown and white
"Does it have any characteristics that stand out?" Underbite and lousy attitude
"What color is it's collar?" Black
"What is your social security number?" uhhhh
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