Have you been following the ransomware attack against Atlanta? They were threatened with a bitcoin ransom, due yesterday. As of this morning, city courts were shut down and residents have been unable to pay their bills.

In an NPR report, there was a previous audit of Atlanta's IT department and they were warned this could happen.

What can we learn from this?

http://www.businessinsider.com/atlanta-cyberattack-cripples-city-operations-2018-3

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/03/28/597758947/time-is-running-out-for-atlanta-in-ransomware-attack
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Expert Comment

by:Lucas Bishop
What can we learn from this?

Daily backups.

Atlanta seems to have dodged a bullet in that the attack isn't targeting infrastructure that could harm citizens (sewer, water, traffic, etc.). The fact that the attackers are only extorting roughly $51k, is astonishing. I guess they figure that price is a sweet spot; not too high, not too low. Question is whether enabling this kind of thing, by paying out, is worth it.

I'm betting that the city wants to pay the ransom, but can't figure out how to...
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Expert Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Cripes you'd think a governmental organization would have the sense to make daily (or even 2 or 3 a day) backups and store them in the cloud. It's not like they can't afford a backup regime for crying out loud!

What can we learn from this? - That whoever the IT Support department they've hired (if they've hired one at all) aught to be sacked!
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Expert Comment

by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)
In one word shit IT sack them all!
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Expert Comment

by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)
But we ALL there will be no blame and Management will get pay rises!
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Expert Comment

by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)
Know is missing autocorrect!
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