Swap-file

Is it possible to have a swap-file in Linux
and not a full swap-partition.
LarsCAsked:
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dspencerConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Not that I know of.  (I would just say "no, it is not", except for the possibility that since it's the Linux community and all, *anything* is remotely possible. =])

The utilities dealing with swap interaction, specifically mkswap and swapon/off, and the way it is accessed to the system through /etc/fstab, seem to be irrevocably tied to swap space being on one or more separate partitions.

See the Installation-HOWTO and (if you're interested in possibly sharing swapfile space with a Windows 3.x installation) the Swap-Space mini-HOWTO for supporting details.

Sorry!

(And just as long as we're on the subject of separate partitions:  my favorite schema is /, /usr, /usr/local, /home, /var, /tmp, and swap, with sharing as appropriate for your installation. Post another question if you want better explanation :) )
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stgreenwaltCommented:
The accepted solution is wrong.  You can create a swap file in Linux that is not a part of a separate partition as follows.  This creates a 1GB swap file:

All from a root prompt (or preceed each line with sudo):
     $ sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/swapfile bs=1024 count=1048576
     $ sudo chmod 600 /mnt/swapfile
     $ sudo mkswap /mnt/swapfile
     $ sudo swapon /mnt/swapfile
     $ sudo echo '/mnt/swapfile none swap sw 0 0' >> /etc/fstab
     $ sudo sysctl vm.swappiness=10

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Check if your new swap is working;
    $ sudo swapon -s

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   If '/mnt/swapfile' appears in the results, then it is working.

Other notes:

If swappiness=0, swapping will occur only if RAM is exhausted.  Increasing the number increases the likelihood that swap will be used even when RAM not exhausted.  You have to experiment with this.  A value of 60 would be reasonable, but a lot depends on your system configuration.
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