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Access Floppy

Posted on 1997-01-03
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I am new at Linux, and I can't figure out how to access my floppy drive (A: or fd0). Can anyone help?
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Question by:bnelson
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dspencer earned 50 total points
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A floppy disk filesystem can be accessed under Linux the same way every other disk is, but it's tricky for DOS users who expect it to happen automatically.  What it is, is that you have to "mount" the filesystem onto your system after you've inserted the floppy disk.  So, put the floppy disk in the drive, and (as root!) issue the command:

  mount -t msdos /dev/fd0 /mnt/drive_a

for an MS-DOS formatted disk, or

  mount -t minix /dev/fd0 /mnt/drive_a

for a Minux format floppy (the standard format for Linux floppies).  

The "/mnt/drive_a" specifies the "mount point" where the floppy disk's directory structure will be grafted, and should be any empty directory you want to use for that purpose.

After doing whatever you want to the floppy disk, remember to un-mount it (umount /dev/fd0) before removing the disk from the drive.

Have fun....
-dls
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