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"partition magic"

Posted on 1997-01-08
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
Hi Experts,

I have a DOS-partition and a Linux-partition.
Is there a way to take some space from my DOS partition and to add that space to
my Linux partition ?
In short : I want to make my Linux partition bigger and not create two separate Linux
partitions.
I know FIPS : but that's only splitting a partition in two.
I know Partition Magic : but that work's only with DOS partitions...
Or is there a tool to add two partitions (with some data on it, using the same Linux FAT-
structure)
to make one ?

Thanks in advance,
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Question by:beta
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mstonge earned 100 total points
ID: 1626769
I believe that you are out of luck if you want to increase the size of an existing linux partition. I say I believe because I never saw it but you never know.  What I would suggest is the following:

Use FIPS and chop a piece of your DOS partition and turn it into a linux native partition.

run mkfs on your new partition using ext2 as filesystem type.

decide which directory you want to put on your partition /var or /home.  These are the most popular to have on a separate partition, me, I use one partition for each, it prevents the root filesystem from fragmenting and gives better performance.

Assuming that you picked /home, mv your /home directory to /home.old and create a new empty directory /home, this is your mount point.

Mount your filesystem on the /home directory by editing your /etc/fstab and then mounting the drive.

Copy all the files from your /home.old to the new home and remove the /home.old


This is probably not what you wanted to hear but I see no other solution.  The final result will be a better, faster system where an overfill of the /home directory structure will not bring the whole thing down.

Marc
mstonge@jklmicro.com
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