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RPC and clnt_create() vs clnttcp_create()

I am trying to learn RPC. I would like to use clnttcp_create() instead of clnt_create() in my client application. How do I do this ? The server portion has svctcp_create(RPC_ANYSOCK, 10240, 10240). So I would then need to do

clnttcp_create(addr, PROGNUM, VERSNUM, sockp, 10240, 10240),
but where does addr, and sockp come in ? does RPC fill them in, or have I to make the connection, and then call clnttcp_create() ?
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perera
Asked:
perera
1 Solution
 
mart010897Commented:
Hi,

I'm pretty sure that:

struct sockaddr_in *addr

needs to be set by you to be the location of the service your client wants to connect to.  Furthermore, the addr struct should contain the port number of the service you are trying to connect to, or 0 if you can look it up using the remote port mapper service.

int *sockp

gets updated by the call, it's a pointer to the socket you are using for this.  But I don't know if it needs to be a socket before the call.  I would think probably yeah it does, cos otherwise i don't see how the function would have anything to work with.

The last two arguments to both calls are supposed to be buffer sizes, set to 0 to use defaults.

I would think that in your client you would use gethostbyname() socket() bind() blah blah blah to create the sockaddr_in *addr and int *sockp and then do your clnttcp_create().

A lot of times when you're dealing with Sun material the only way to find out what to do is to look at someone else has done it, preferably someone who doesn't work for Sun :)  Get a look at the source code for another RPC client/server pair if you get stuck...

But I'm fairly sure that the info i gave above is correct; I did it once upon a time, and I got it working... beyond that it all gets fuzzy... :)

Good luck, and feel free to mail me directly...

Mart
mart@voicenet.com
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