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logging console to file

Posted on 1997-02-04
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
How can I log the console of a Solaris 2.5.1 server to a file? I know about contool, but I'm looking for an easier way...
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Question by:jonie
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pxh earned 100 total points
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Look into /var/adm/messages you will find system messages logged there (after reboot a new file is started old will be save in messages.x).
Be aware what system messages really mean, e.g. if you start a license manager during startup, which writes to the stdout those message will appear on the console (which happened to be the stdout during startup), however these are not true system messages and aren't logged.

You may also configure the logging, look into the syslogd man page for details.


Hope thise helps.


Peter

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