Relation between Partitions and Filesystems

Hi, I have just installed Linux slackware on my pc.
I have a 2 gig drive where 1.6 gigs is the first partition
having all the DOS files and the rest is for Linux.

I am not familiar with the relation or link if any of Linux
partitions and Linux filesystems. Besides I always find
conflicting pieces of information which only slows everything.

Being a user of Unix, I am used to seeing the following or
similar listing on my screen when I do a "mount" or "df" on
the $ prompt:-

/  .....blocks.etc...
/usr  ......blocks etc...
/proc ......blocks .etc...
/home .....blocks etc.....
/tmp  .....same............

Clearly there are 5 filesystems here. But when I do the same
on my machine just after logging in after my install, I see

/dosd  ....blocks..etc...
/     .....blocks.etc..  

Only 2 filesystems. When I created my partitions using "fdisk"
in linux, I created a 16M+ Swap partition plus
                    a 300M+ Linux Native partition plus
                    a  35M+ Linux Native partition.
Besides I cannot create more than 4 partitions in my PC, leave
alone having 5+ partitions for Linux itself. How so ?

In most HOW-TOs it says that you should create a 80+M partition
for Root and "create" partitions later for User and system
files.

If I deinstall everything (*Which I'd rather not do*), and then
do a repartitioning with the first Linux Native primary partition
being 80M+ , then will I run out of space during install - Because
the documentation says that you need min 250M if you'd like to
install X and all.... I am clearly confused here and have stopped
short till I get my system properly set. Could someone kindly
enlighten me. Why do I not see different filesystems mounted ??
I think I may have to "mount" them, but then does "a" file-system
reside on "a" partition, - In that case, I'd have to repartition
and then go ahead and mount right ? I don't know.

Any help will be anticipatingly appreciated.
thanks,
- Dan
dmedhoraAsked:
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duxConnect With a Mentor Commented:
You must have a swap partition and at least 1 linux partition. The normal linux filesystem is ext2. You can have diferent filesystems (minix, umsdos, vfat, ext, ext2, ...) on diferent partitions.
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