We help IT Professionals succeed at work.

Detect that user is on a slow link

wclemens
wclemens asked
on
632 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-23
I would like to be able to run a command-line utility at the start of my domain logon script to determine whether a user is connected to the network over a slow link ("slow" being a configurable parameter). A value would be returned (via errorlevel?) which would allow me to tailor what else runs from the logon script.

Example: LAN-connected users would download and execute a virus scan program from the server. Users connected by modem would bypass this step, as it might take as long as 20 minutes to complete depending on modem speed and line quality.

It has been suggested before that I use NETSPEED, which comes with SMS, but I have not been able to find sufficient information even in the SMS Resource Kit, to apply it.

I would be grateful for a reference either to some other utility I could use for this function, or for sufficient information to be able to use NETSPEED.
Comment
Watch Question

Author

Commented:
Edited text of question

Author

Commented:
Edited text of question
ot

Commented:
It would be much simpler to set an environment variable on the modem-connected PC's, and base scanning on this variable.

Author

Commented:
(1) Corporate environment with many non-technical users. I cannot depend on them either to set an environment variable or not screw it up even if it were originally set correctly by IS group. Even if this could be overcome, ...
(2) Many users have notebook computers which sometimes are connected to the LAN and sometimes dial in. The solution must adjust to dynamic conditions.

Commented:
I do s aimilar thing to work out which site I'm on.

When I log in, I run a bit of perl script, which does and
ipconfigure, and fings the TCP/IP number from that.
This IP number tells me where I am.

If you have a predetermined set of IP numbers allocated for
remote login, this could be used to work it out.

If IP numbers are a problem for you, then you could use 'dumpevt' from the NT resource kit to dump a small section of the event log.  You could then see what type of login occured for this user most recently.  This may be a bit too slow though.

The other thing to do is to log the user in on both, and see
if there's a consistant env variable that's different between
the sessions (Slim change in this case)

Author

Commented:
Interesting, but back to the original question: Is there an already-existing utility I can use to determine, from a command line, that a user is on a slow link? Or can someone provide sufficient information about NETSPEED, which I already have as part of SMS, to be able to apply it independently?

Using IPCONFIG to determine IP address is something I have considered before, and if I could reliably detect the existence of IP address in one of several particular ranges, that would be a step in the right direction although, for a variety of reasons, it is not a complete solution to my problem. Parsing the IPCONFIG response into a "slow" or "not slow" is a missing piece. The variety of ways that users access our corporate LAN now and in the future would make the IP ranges a moving target. Also, the same script needs to run on Windows for Workgroups, Windows 95, and Windows NT clients.

uli

Commented:
- http://www.microsoft.com/kb/
- search for 'netspeed'
- 3 articles about how-to/limitations/gotchas.

Author

Commented:
Already viewed these three articles before posting the question. The information there gives some hints but only in a full SMS context of using NETSPEED. Since we have not yet rolled out SMS, modifying SMS registry settings as suggested is not applicable to my situation. I don't know, in fact, if NETSPEED can even be used effectively on a stand-alone basis.
Commented:
This one is on us!
(Get your first solution completely free - no credit card required)
UNLOCK SOLUTION

Gain unlimited access to on-demand training courses with an Experts Exchange subscription.

Get Access
Why Experts Exchange?

Experts Exchange always has the answer, or at the least points me in the correct direction! It is like having another employee that is extremely experienced.

Jim Murphy
Programmer at Smart IT Solutions

When asked, what has been your best career decision?

Deciding to stick with EE.

Mohamed Asif
Technical Department Head

Being involved with EE helped me to grow personally and professionally.

Carl Webster
CTP, Sr Infrastructure Consultant
Empower Your Career
Did You Know?

We've partnered with two important charities to provide clean water and computer science education to those who need it most. READ MORE

Ask ANY Question

Connect with Certified Experts to gain insight and support on specific technology challenges including:

  • Troubleshooting
  • Research
  • Professional Opinions
Unlock the solution to this question.
Join our community and discover your potential

Experts Exchange is the only place where you can interact directly with leading experts in the technology field. Become a member today and access the collective knowledge of thousands of technology experts.

*This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

OR

Please enter a first name

Please enter a last name

8+ characters (letters, numbers, and a symbol)

By clicking, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.