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Win95 refuses to load!

Posted on 1997-03-12
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
While logging on to AOL, I started their version of Netscape. It crashed my computer. Who knows what happened. I have run Win95 for nearly a year now on this system w/o any problems.

I have fdisked my drive at least 3 times. Reinstalled win95 with the help of a MS tech who told me I have a boot virus. I downloaded McAfee's scan program-they say if you Fdisk a drive, no virus can surrive.

I loaded the machine, an AMD 486/133 jumped to 160, with 32 meg RAM, with MS DOS 5.0 reloaded win3.1 and can get it working. I have Norton's utilities for win95. Took the programs that checks the system off my notebook and ran it on the 486. No problems.

Win 95 loads find-I install the very basic systems. When the computer reboots, a Win 95 function after installation, it checks the memory fine, shows the CMOS "system" screen, that is,  A drive B drive connected so much memory etc, in a rectangular box.  Under this it shows the onboard cache just below the box on the right, 256 K, then it shows my cpu speed-160 mH. He it just hangs.

Like I said, I have run this system for nearly a year w/o a single problem! It all started with AOL's netscape.

Can you help
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Question by:kalford823
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smeebud earned 200 total points
Comment Utility
If your computer is a Plug and Play computer, reinstall
Windows 95 using the following command:
setup /p I

Let me know how it works, and if any error messages occur, reply including the exact phrasing of the message.
Because you are loading over dos 5.0 I believe you should read the following to see if there are inconsistancies:
-----------------------------------------------------------
especially this part;
(this is useful only if you have MS-DOS version 5.x or 6.x on the
computer).
---------------------------------------------------------------
MORE INFORMATION
The [Paths] section can contain the following settings:
HostWinBootDrv=<Root of Boot Drive>
Default: C
Purpose: Specifies the location for the root of the boot drive.
WinBootDir=<Windows Directory>
Default: Directory specified during Setup (for example, C:\WINDOWS)
Purpose: Lists the location of the necessary files for booting.
WinDir=<Windows Directory>
Default: Directory specified during Setup (for example, C:\WINDOWS)
Purpose: Lists the location of the Windows 95 directory specified
during Setup.
The [Options] section can contain the following settings and must be manually inserted:
AutoScan=<Number>
Default: 1
Purpose: Defines whether or not ScanDisk is run after a bad
shutdown.
A setting of 0 does not run ScanDisk; 1 runs ScanDisk with
prompts; 2 runs ScanDisk with no prompts.
This setting is used only by OEM Service Release 2.
BootDelay=<Seconds>
Default: 2
Purpose: Sets the amount of time the "Starting Windows" message
remains on the screen before Windows 95 continues to boot.
BootSafe=<Boolean>
Default: 0
Purpose: A setting of 1 forces your computer to boot in safe Mode.
BootGUI=<Boolean>
Default: 1
Purpose: A setting of 1 forces the loading of the GUI interface. A setting of 0 disables the loading of the GUI interface.
BootKeys=<Boolean>
Default: 1
Purpose: A setting of 1 enables the use of the function key boot
options (that is, F4, F5, F6, and F8). A setting of 0 disables
the use of these function keys during the boot process
NOTE: A setting of BootKeys=0 overrides the use of BootDelay=n.
BootMenu=<Boolean>
Default: 0
Purpose: A setting of 1 enables the Startup menu. If this setting is 0, then you must press the F8 key when "Starting Windows 95"
appears to invoke the Startup menu.
BootMenuDefault=<Number>
Default: 1 if the system is running correctly
3 if the system hung in the previous instance
Purpose: Use this setting to set the default menu item for startup.
BootMenuDelay=<Number>
Default: 30
Purpose: This setting is used to set the number of seconds your
system will pause on the Startup menu. If the number of seconds counts down to 0 without intervention, the BootMenuDefault is activated.
NOTE: This option is not functional unless BootMenu=1 has been
added to the [Options] section of the Msdos.sys file.
BootMulti=<Boolean>
Default: 0
Purpose: A setting of 0 disables the multi-boot option. (For example, with a setting of 0 you cannot boot your previous operating system.) A setting of 1 enables the F4 and F8 keys to boot your previous operating system.
NOTE: This setting is set to 0 by default to prevent you from
inadvertently starting MS-DOS and damaging data by running a
disk utility that does not recognize long file names.
BootWarn=<Boolean>
Default: 1
Purpose: A setting of 0 disables the safe mode boot warning message and the Startup menu.
BootWin=<Boolean>
Default: 1
Purpose: A setting of 1 forces Windows 95 to load at startup. A
setting of 0 disables Windows 95 as your default operating system (this is useful only if you have MS-DOS version 5.x or 6.x on the
computer).
NOTE: Pressing F4 inverts the default only if BootMulti=1. (For
example, pressing the F4 key with a setting of 0 forces Windows 95 to load.)
DoubleBuffer=<Boolean>
Default: 0
Purpose: A setting of 1 is a conditional setting that enables double-buffering for controllers that need it (for example, SCSI
controllers). A setting of 2 is an unconditional setting that
enables double-buffering regardless of whether the controller
needs it or not.
DBLSpace=<Boolean>
Default: 1
Purpose: A setting of 1 allows the automatic loading of the
DBLSPACE.BIN file. A setting of 0 prevents the automatic loading of this file.
NOTE: Windows 95 uses either Dblspace.bin or Drvspace.bin if either is present in the root folder of the boot drive at startup. To disable a compression driver from being loaded at startup, use both settings in the Msdos.sys file. For example:
DBLSpace=0
DRVSpace=0
DRVSpace=<Boolean>
Default: 1
Purpose: A setting of 1 allows the automatic loading of the
DRVSPACE.BIN file. A setting of 0 prevents the automatic loading of this file.
NOTE: Windows 95 uses either Dblspace.bin or Drvspace.bin if either is present in the root folder of the boot drive at startup. To disable a compression driver from being loaded at startup, use both settings in the Msdos.sys file. For example:
DBLSpace=0
DRVSpace=0
LoadTop=<Boolean>
Default: 1
Purpose: A setting of 0 does not let Windows 95 load
COMMAND.COM or DRVSPACE.BIN/DBLSPACE.BIN at the top of 640K. If you are having compatibility problems with software that makes assumptions about the available memory try setting this to 0.
Logo=<Boolean>
Default: 1
Purpose: A setting of 1 forces the default Windows 95 logo to appear.
A setting of 0 prevents the animated logo from being displayed.
A setting of 0 also avoids hooking a variety of interrupts
that can create incompatibilities with certain third-party
memory managers.
Network=<Boolean>
Default: 0
Purpose: A setting of 1 means the network was installed and adds
"Safe mode with network support" as an option on the Windows 95
Startup menu.
The Msdos.sys file also contains a section that contains seemingly useless information. This information is necessary to support programs that expect the Msdos.sys file to be at least 1024 bytes in length. For example, if an anti-virus program detects that the Msdos.sys file is less than 1024 bytes, it may assume that the Msdos.sys file is infected with a virus. If you delete the Msdos.sys file your computer will not start.
The following statement, followed by a series of "X"s, appears in the Msdos.sys file:
;The following lines are required for compatibility with other programs.
;Do not remove them (Msdos.sys needs to be >1024 bytes).
Since each line begins with a semicolon (;), the lines are not read by the system.
How to Edit the Msdos.sys File
If you want to change any of the values in the Msdos.sys file, follow these steps to edit the file:
1. Click the Start button, point to Find, then click Files Or Folders.
2. In the Named box, type "msdos.sys" (without quotation marks). In the Look In box, click your boot drive (usually drive C, or drive H if drive C is compressed). Click the Find Now button.
3. Use the right mouse button to click the Msdos.sys file and then click Properties on the menu that appears.
4. Click the Read-Only and Hidden check boxes to remove these attributes from the Msdos.sys file and then click OK.
5. Use the right mouse button to click the Msdos.sys file and then click Open With on the menu that appears.
6. In the "Choose the program you want to use" box, click WordPad and then click OK.
7. Make the changes you want to the Msdos.sys file. When you are done, save the file and then quit WordPad.
8. Use the right mouse button to click the Msdos.sys file and then click Properties on the menu that appears.
9. Click the Read-Only and Hidden check boxes to set these attributes for the file and then click OK. Close the Find window.
Quit and then restart Windows.

bwil@erinet.com

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Expert Comment

by:smeebud
Comment Utility
Oh yea, I forgot. Go to
http://www.os2bbs.com/download/util.html and get "cachechk.zip. I had a similar proboblem with a motherboard that reported 256k cache but in fact was one of those "cacheless wonders".

If you can'yt get it write me and I'll attach it.

bwil@erinet.com
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Expert Comment

by:kenb030297
Comment Utility
I have run across a few viruses that survive fdisking the drive although they are rare. I would suggest getting a friend with a known clean system to make you a boot disk (write protected) along with a copy of some virus checker - also known clean. Then do a clean boot and check for viruses. Sounds like there is a possibility of one still be lurking down there ...
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Expert Comment

by:kenb030297
Comment Utility
I have run across a few viruses that survive fdisking the drive although they are rare. I would suggest getting a friend with a known clean system to make you a boot disk (write protected) along with a copy of some virus checker - also known clean. Then do a clean boot and check for viruses. Sounds like there is a possibility of one still be lurking down there ...
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