• C

Flickering graphic


I need to move some graphic objects on the screen without they flicker.
So (i've Turbo C 1.0) i tried to use the 'setvisualpage' and the
'setactivepage', modifying graphic in the invisible page and switching
beetween pages. I thought in this way i could have stable images.
But it doesn't work :(

To be more precise: the following code is a good example of my problem.
Let there be 2 pages (0 and 1)

Does anyone know why the line on the screen flickers?

setcolor(YELLOW);    
setvisualpage(0);
setactivepage(0);

line(40,40,300,140);    // draws a yellow line on page 0
setactivepage(1);
line(40,40,300,140);    // draws an identical line on page 1

int p=0;              // starting 'visual page'

for (long i=0; i<1000; i++)    // just a few time of suffering :)
{
 p=1-p;                   // switch beetween pages
 setactivepage(p);    // sets active page as the invisible one
 setcolor(BLACK);      
 line(40,40,300,140);  // deletes the line
 setcolor(YELLOW);
 line(40,40,300,140);  // redraws the line in the same place
 setvisualpage(p);     // shows the hidden page
}
blaze030297Asked:
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BenWeissCommented:
blaze,

I don't have my docs here, but I'd be willing to bet that you're using a video mode that only has one video page.  Check your video card, find out how much VRAM you have, and check the video mode you're using in the documentation.  If you find that you can't find that info, try using a 320x200 - 16 color mode, and see if the problem persists.

Also, as a former video-game programmer, I would highly recommend forgetting Borland's BGI (Borland Graphic Interface).  It's pretty well known to be slow.  You'd be better off buying or checking out from a library a graphics book, and learning how to implement fast graphics routines in Assembly Language.  However, since you're running Turbo C, while you might be able to do inline assembly (I can't remember if it has that capability), I do know that it doesn't come with Turbo Assembler.  However, you can get almost as good graphics in C if you write your graphics routines using integer math and pointers.

Ben Weiss
0

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blaze030297Author Commented:
Hi, Ben
too bad i'm almost sure that there are
two pages. I've tried with code like:

setactivepage(0);
setvisualpage(0);
line(0,0,50,50);
setactivepage(1);
line(600,0,400,100);
getch();
....
setvisualpage(1);
getch();
....
setvisualpage(0);

And the behaviour seems to be correct.
At start i can see the first line and not the second.
When i press a key i can see the second line.
When i press a key again i can see the
first line again.
So i think there are actually two pages.
(after all i use only a 640x350x16 resolution)


0
gcormierCommented:
Blaze, I have to agree with BenWeiss... The BGI is horrible. Making some graphic functions is VERY easy. If you'd like, I could show you how / send you some code. You'll save yourself alot by ditching the BGI. (IMHO)
0
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BenWeissCommented:
Blaze,

Okay, then it may be that you are in fact using two video pages.  However, consider also that you are using BGI, and can't be sure how it's handling this.  Probably it's making a BIOS call, or even a VESA one, both of which can be slow.

Also, since you're using a 16 color mode, you're actually using four color planes.  This means that each of your pixels has to be drawn four times!  This is one of the reasons that any current video game you find is in 256 color mode...because it doesn't use color planes, just a byte per pixel.

An excellent book that you might try is "Flights of Fantasy".  It not only goes into how to write fast graphics routines, but how to write a fast 3D graphics engine.

Ben Weiss
0
rakyCommented:
Flickering is due to the fact you write the screen when the screen is refreshed... to avoid flickering you have to wait that the refreshing is at the beginning of the screen to be sure a picture wouldn't be draw in two passes.

0
blaze030297Author Commented:
Raky, do you know if there is a way to
wait the refreshing in C?
Or it can be done only in Assembly?
0
rakyCommented:
There is a way to wait the refreshing in C :-( but i can't remember me ... Wait, ...

you have just to look for a register;, but I don't really know which one, but if you find it, you have to wait that this register is set to 0, for flipping the page



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