Kernel Upgrade

I currently have redhat4.0, linux kernel 2.0.18 installed. I downloaded the 2.0.29 kernel and installed it to my /usr/src/linux directory. Next I ran make config, and compiled my kernel. Then I performed the following in this order..
make dep; make clean; make zlilo

after 20 min or so I was back at my prompt and typed
sync; sync
reboot


Then the system rebooted and I was back to my 2.0.18 login.

Why is this? It should read 2.0.29 right?

I then created a boot floppy by doing this

fdformat /fd0
cd /usr/src/linux/arch/i386/boot
rdev -R zImage 1
cat zImage > /dev/fd0

Rebooted from floppy and there I was at a 2.0.29 prompt.
I have the new kernel source in my /usr/src/linux dir, Im not sure why it wont boot 2.0.29 from the hard drive. Do you know why? Im almost out of points here, please help!!!!

To sum all this up I dont want to boot from floppy, Id rather boot from my hard disk. I have the drive partitioned as follows.

/dev/hda1   main linux system
/dev/hda2   swap

The drive is IDE type and Im very new to Linux. Can you reply in idiot type terms cause Im a newbie. : )
denise032397Asked:
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denise032397Author Commented:
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denise032397Author Commented:
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ggeensCommented:
Red Hat apparently stores its kernel (the result of make zlilo) on a non-standard place.
Basically, you can try this:
- download the new kernel sources from Red Hat. These will install your new kernel in the same place as the 2.0.18 you have now.
- Look in /etc/lilo.conf . There should be a line containing something like `image=.../vmlinuz'. Change the path to /vmlinuz (i.e., replace anything between the `=' and `vmlinuz' by a `/')
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wiggsCommented:
I would be better to move the new kernel file to the same location as the old kernel file is.  I ran into this same situation when I recently installed a new kernel (V2.0.30) "make zImage" created the new kernel in the /usr/src/linux/i386/boot subdirectory (yours maybe in another directory, to find it use the following command "find . -name zImage -print" from the root directory.  Once you have located it, use the copy command to
put it in your root directory (where your current kernel is located).
NOTE: Make a backup copy of your current kernel before over writing it with the new one ( I used "mv vmlinuz vmlinuz.old").  Once you are ready to copy the new kernel to the root directory use the following command ("cp zImage /vmlinuz" from the directory that has your zImage kernel file.
You should do this as root.
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