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Redhat 4.1 upg can not find root

Posted on 1997-04-05
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I have RedHat 4.0 in /dev/sdb9 (I have hda, sda and sdb), but the upgrade
program does not see the /dev/sdb9, it only sees the other Linux
partitions. The reason why I have Linux on sdb9 is that it is the fastest
drive and I think it is clever to have root on the fastest drive.

I have used the latest supp.img, so that should not be the problem.

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Question by:lahtinenk
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ggeens earned 100 total points
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It might be that there is no device file for /dev/sdb9 on the boot image.
Load the boot disk, go to a shell prompt and type:
mknod /dev/sdb9 b 8 25
I am not familiar with Red Hat's boot disks, so I'm not sure how to get a shell prompt from that.
You could try to mount the boot image on a loopback device, and the create the device file.
According to the man pages, SCSI disks only support 8 partitions. But since you already have used this partition, I think the man page is out of date.
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