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Borland C++ builder and Visual C++, which to learn?

Posted on 1997-04-05
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Last Modified: 2006-11-17
I plan to learn C++. I want to make some programs,
which  will be used in PC-based real-time process control. The programs will communcate with I/O devices quite a lot and at the same time provide GUI  for the user to monitor and control the process. I know both BCB and VC5 are based on Win95 and WinNT and I heard NT can be the platform for this application though it is not "real" real-time OS.

So for this kind of application, which is better? Or lower versions such as Borland C++ 3.1 is enough?

Thank you.
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Question by:zhao040597
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Expert Comment

by:Pascal040697
ID: 1162591
I can give you an answer provided you give me just a little more background information:
What is your target platform?
What prior programming experience do you have?
How much money do you have to spend?

You can email me at:
seanh@enter.net
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Accepted Solution

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imajica earned 90 total points
ID: 1162592
The Borland C++ Builder package is much better suited to you if you are a beginner to Windows programming. It is 32bit only so no Win3.1 application development is supported. I use this package and have found it a very rapid way to develop C++ applicatons. It is however lacking in some more advanced tools. For general application development this is not a problem. The product is still too new to see how well software developers will support it in terms of API's etc, but like Delphi plug-in components are its real strength.

Microsoft Visual C is the better option if you already have a knowledge of C++, and want more in depth Windows and particularly API support - you will find most new developing technology products provide their API in Microsoft format. I cannot remember if this version is 32bit specific.

Borland C++ 3.1 will certainly do the job, but you will find that a lot more of your time is spent developing the Windows user interface, than in the above two products.

I would question your choice of Windows NT as the platform. I was unclear if you meant the platform to develop on or the platform to run the application on. NT is ideal for development purposes, however by its very nature it prevents you from accessing the hardware directly, so for real-time critical applications it is unsuitable. Try Windows 95, or ideally DOS with a Turbo Vision front end.

I really need more detailed info on the type of I/O access you refer to.
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