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*roff on man pages

Posted on 1997-04-06
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
What switches do I send to nroff(? is this the right *roff) to make a Man Page look as if I had called man filename?

For example...I have downloaded a package, am interested in more details.  So, I go (insert answer here) man/man1/kewlthing.1 | less
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Question by:lordvorp
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jlee040697 earned 50 total points
ID: 1627085
nroff is usually just an invocation of groff, try something
like:

groff -Tascii -mandoc filename.1 | less

to view it on a terminal... or

groff -Tps -mandoc filename.1 | lpr

to print it on a PostScript compatible printer. ;-)

On the other hand, most versions of man will interpret
their argument as a file if it has a slash in it, so try:

man /usr/local/man/filename.1

or if you're in the same directory as the file,

man ./filename.1

James Lee <jlee@math.purdue.edu>
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