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Uninstalling Linux

Posted on 1997-05-03
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
currently i have redhat installed on my system(along with w95). i would like to uninstall linux so that i only have w95. is there any particular way to do this? i used fips to repartition my hard drive and was just planning to use DOS fdisk to eliminate the linux partition. would this work or is there a better way?
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Question by:GreatOne
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n3mtr earned 40 total points
ID: 1627384
Thats the easiest way, and if you installed lilo in the master boot record you can do an fdisk /mbr to get rid of it.  Make sure your win95 partition is set as bootable.

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by:elbandit
ID: 1627385
When Lilo overwrites a boot sector, it saves a backup copy in /boot/boot.xxyy, where xxyy are the major and minor numbers of the device, in hex. You can see the major and minor
numbers of your disk or partition by running ``ls -l /dev/device''. For example, the first sector of /dev/hda (major 3, minor 0) will be saved in /boot/boot.0300, installing
Lilo on /dev/fd0 creates /boot/boot.0200 and installing on /dev/sdb3 (major 8, minor 19) creates /boot/boot.0813. Note that Lilo won't create the file if there is already
one so you don't need to care about the backup copy whenever you reinstall Lilo (for example, after recompiling your kernel). The backup copies found in /boot/ are always the
snapshot of the situation before installing any Lilo.

If you ever need to uninstall Lilo (for example, in the unfortunate case you need to uninstall Linux), you just need to restore the original boot sector. If Lilo is installed in /dev/hda,
just do ``dd if=/boot/boot.0300 of=/dev/hda bs=446 count=1'' (I personally just do ``cat /boot/boot.0300 > /dev/hda'', but this is not safe, as this will restore
the original partition table as well, which you might have modified in the meanwhile). This command is much easier to run than trying ``fdisk /mbr'' from a DOS shell: it allows
you to cleanly remove Linux from a disk without ever booting anything but Linux. After removing Lilo remember to run Linux' fdisk to destroy any Linux partition (DOS' fdisk is
unable to remove non-dos partitions).

If you installed Lilo on your root partition (e.g., /dev/hda2), nothing special needs to be done to uninstall Lilo. Just run Linux' fdisk to remove Linux partitions from the partition
table. You must also mark the DOS partition as bootable.
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