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Lilo

Posted on 1997-05-04
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I have os2 and winnt one my first HD which is IDE, I put
Red Hat linux on my second drive which is scsi. I put lilo
in the root of linux and added it to os2 boot.mgr. When
I tell os2 boot.mgr to load Linux, Lilo come up and gives
me options to load dos or winNT, NO Linux.  When I use the
rescue disks and go to Linux, looks like it loaded oK
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Question by:vjniemey
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gysbert1 earned 100 total points
ID: 1627386
Check your /etc/lilo.conf file and see that there is actually an entry for linux in there. Also, just run lilo, and it will go through the config file and display which bootups are available... If its not one of these, then I'm at a loss.
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