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Last good known configuration during boot sequence

Posted on 1997-05-07
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Last Modified: 2013-12-14
What is the last good known configuration? It is supposed to be that configuration that was valid directly before I made any changes.

But when I press the space bar during the boot sequence I get a configuration that was valid after the initial installion of NT, so all later modifications are unrecoverably lost.

Is there a way to determine  the last good known configuration, to be sure that the system will boot correctly even if the space bar was pressed by mistake?

Thanks for any help!

Carsten
Please reply by email csachs@sprynet.com

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Question by:sachs050797
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by:nylja
ID: 1765099
Nt-version? Servicepack-level?

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by:waltbowman
ID: 1765100
Not an answer but...
I'd like to share one on my practices. Before I make any changes at all I always go into CONTROL PANEL-SYSTEM-HARDWARE PROFILES and make a copy of ORIGINAL CONFIGURATION usually with todays date in the name. If everthing still works when I'm done, I delete the backup file. I also keep 2 diskettes handy, the repair disk which is made during the install process, and an "NT Boot Disk". To make this disk, format a disk(must use NT to format), copy the 4 following files to it: boot.ini, bootsect.dos, NTDETECT.COM, ntldr.  They're not case sensitive but this is what they will look like. With this disk you can boot NT from drive a: Make these 2 disks after any successful changes. To make repair disk click START- RUN- type RDISK and hit enter.
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changk earned 150 total points
ID: 1765101
Per my knowledge, last known good configuration is what is saved when you run the RDISK utility, short for Rescue Disk.  This makes some (?) archives of selected registry hives, with other NT and system-related files.  Once that is saved, you have the option to save a copy of that configuration to floppy (a rescue disk.)

Anyway, this option is there espically when you add new hardware or software.  If you used RDISK right before you made that hardware or software change, and NT for some reason doesn't work correctly with that change, you can go back into the last known good configuration, and (hopefully) the system will load the way it did before the change.
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by:steveho
ID: 1765102
The "last known good" is updated EVERY time there is a successful poweron AND login.  So, if you reboot your computer and login to NT successfully, the current config now becomes the "last known good".
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