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Intilasing References

Posted on 1997-05-07
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Last Modified: 2010-04-10
Hi,
How do you intialise refrences, when they occur as member functions.

ie, the case I have boils down to (if you ignore the application specifics)

int j;

class malc
      {
      public:
            malc():m_i(* (new int))
            ~malc{delete m_i;}
            int & m_i;
      }

complier says that I need to initiliase the reference to a non temp int.  The best way I thought of was the constructor shown above, with the corresponding destructor.

I don't now if this is the right way to go about it, or if I'm completely on the wrong track.  So if you could fix the above code, or just show me the more correct way of doing it as it just doesn't look right to me, or say my code is wonderful and be done with it :)

Thanks

Malcolm



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Question by:trevena
2 Comments
 
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Accepted Solution

by:
LucHoltkamp earned 100 total points
ID: 1163342
You're code is almost correct! You forgot a '&' in the destructor. I type the code again, how it should be:

struct Test
{
  int &i;   // the alias, must be initialised in constructor
  Test() : i(*new int) {}
  ~Test() { delete &i; }
};  

One more thing, I'm using BC5 witch is a ANSI-compliant compiler. If your's not, it could be the source of the problem. (Tried to save money ?? ;) )
0
 

Author Comment

by:trevena
ID: 1163343
>One more thing, I'm using BC5 witch is a ANSI-compliant compiler. If >your's not, it could be the source of the problem. (Tried to save money ?? >;) )

No
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