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setEchoCharacter problem in Netscape for BSDI

Posted on 1997-05-08
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Last Modified: 2010-05-18
In an applet I'm working on, when I set a textfield's
echo character (via setEchoCharacter) to '\0' to reset it
to normal operation after setting it to '*' for password
entry, the textfield becomes unusable (ie: does not accept
keyboard input).  This is only a problem under Netscape for
UNIX (FreeBSD and BSDI... maybe others also).

Is there a work around for this bug?
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Question by:dsnider
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2 Comments
 
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Accepted Solution

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jpk041897 earned 40 total points
ID: 1220249
According to sun documentation in JDK 1.02, there is no way that you can reset a textboxs echo character back to normal operation, although you can set it to a different echo character.. Its documented as a "feature" not a bug.

I'm not sure about 1.1 but I belive this behaviour was maintained. At any rate, if you are using Netscap 3.x, you are using jdk 1.02 so the particular issue is moot.

Workarround:

Place 2 textboxes in the same place placed so that they both ocupy the same coordinates inside the frame. Say txt1 and passtxt. Then in the init method() or equivalent do:

txt1.enable(false);
txt1.setVisible(false);
passtxt.enable(true);
passtxt..setVisible(true);

Once you have procesed the event for the password, you can end the event by inverting the display logic.

Hope this helps.
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Author Comment

by:dsnider
ID: 1220250
I figured I'd have to resort to such measures... I just don't
understand why setEchoCharacter('\0') works in just about EVERY
JAVA implementation there is EXCEPT _some_ versions of Netscape.

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