What is .LIB/.DEF

I'm an experienced Delphi programmer, and I've just started programming Borland C++ Builder. Right now I'm programming this C++ DLL. Then I wonder: What is a .LIB-file, what is a .DEF-file (I understand that my DLL should be shipped with these files, or???), and how do I make these files, do I have to make these files at all?

/Martin Ahler, Denmark
ahlerAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

ShrifCommented:
When you give someone your DLL file, there are two ways that they can use it in their own application.  In either case, they will be "loading" your DLL from their application.  DLL's can be loaded "implicitly" and "explicitly".  When a DLL is loaded explicitly, the user uses the Windows API calls LoadLibrary, GetProcAddress and FreeLibrary directly to: load the DLL, obtain function pointers to the DLL's functions and then free the DLL.  This is called explicit loading because the calling program must explicitly call LoadLibrary, GetProcAddress and FreeLibrary in order to use the DLL.  Implicit loading is when the DLL is loaded by the operating system on behalf of the application.  When the user launches the application, the operating system automatically knows what DLL's the application requires.  This is because the application has the list of required DLL's inside of its header's "import" list.  You can view a DLL's import list by using the DUMPBIN or TDUMP utility.  How does the import list get there?  It gets there because the application linked to the DLL's import library, which is a file that has the .LIB extension and the same name as the DLL.  As far as the linker is concerned, an .LIB is just another library.  But an "import" library is a special kind of library in that it doesn't have the actual code of the DLL but only forwarding addresses to point to the .DLL file.  The .LIB file is used so that the calling application's linker will resolve references to the functions in the DLL.  When you ship a DLL to a customer, you should also ship the DLL's import library along with your DLL.  If your customer is a C/C++ user, they will want this library so that they can link to your DLL implicitly.  The .Lib file is created automatically when link the DLL.  When the .DLL is created by your compiler, the .LIB file is created along with it.  A .DEF file, on the other hand, is not shipped with the DLL.  It is used by the author of the DLL to indicate which of the functions in the DLL are to be exported to the outside world.  A .DEF file is a handle coded text file listing those files that the DLL author wishes to export.  A .DEF file is added to a DLL project just like a source file is.  A .DEF file may also be specified on the command line to the linker.  A .DEF file is an input file to the linker.  Those functions that are exported, end up listed in the DLL header's "export" list.  You can view the exports section of a DLL by using the DUMPBIN or TDUMP utility.  Depending on how a DLL or an EXE is constructed, the DLL's or EXE's import and export lists may be viewed from Windows 95 or Windows NT's Explorer by right-clicking on the file and selecting "Quick View"

0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
C++

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.