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Exceptions, DLL's and Threads

Hi,

I'm working on an application which raises custom exceptions from inside a DLL. The exceptions are raised both from within the main thread as well as from a second thread (which exists inside the DLL).

Now, when the exception in the 2nd thread is raised, the default handler pops up behind all other windows!!

When the exception in the main thread (ie - inside the call to the DLL), the handler does not display and the message passed to the exception's Create constructor does not get displayed. Further, after closing the exception handler dialog, the application does not terminate!

If I wrap the DLL call in a try/except block, then re-raise the exception - there is no change. I can of course call Application.Terminate in my handler - but why should I have to?? And I can't do that with the exception in the 2nd thread because the call to the DLL returns before the exception gets raised!

One final puzzle - if I replace the default exception handler (ie: Application.OnException := My Handler), it NEVER gets called when a DLL exception is raised!!!

I'm obviously missing something pretty basic here .... any ideas?

Reply via email please, as I don't frequent this site

Best Regards,

Paul
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sonique
Asked:
sonique
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1 Solution
 
sperlingCommented:
There's only one simple solution to this.... Change your DLL to avoid exceptions, and rather report errors back to the application by e.g. a callback or some private messages.

Due to Delphis method of storing RTTI (=Run-Time Type Information) in the apps/dlls you create, an exception raised in the DLL will not be of the same type as the same exception raised in the app, and an On Exception statement in the app would not catch an exception raised in the DLL.

The reason your Application.OnException ain't called, is because the DLL doesn't know about the application object in your app, and it'll use the ExceptProc procedure pointer for processing exceptions.

I'd suggest you replaced the ExceptProc pointer with a pointer to your own error-handling method, which preferrably should send a message to the application indicating which exception occurred. Then, your applications message handler could recreate and raise the exception, allowing for normal processing of the error.

Regards,

Erik.
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mheacockCommented:
You should invite SPERLING to answer this so that you can grade
him.  His comment was a pretty good answer.
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mheacockCommented:
oops.
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soniqueAuthor Commented:
How do I get back to SPERLING's reply so that I can grade it?
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