Problem Routing Network through ISDN on Sparc 10

I'm attempting to connect an ISDN box (a Combinet 2060, if it makes
any difference) to my Sparc 10 in order to do a network-to-network
connection to a remote site. Here are some details:

IP number of local Sparc 10 machine: 130.151.X.Y
IP number of local ISDN box: 130.151.X.Z
IP number of remote ISDN box: 144.15.A.B
IP number of remote machine: 144.15.C.D

The local ISDN box is connected (physically) to le1, so I think I
need to do an "ifconfig" on le1, then a couple of "route" commands,
and then set up an entry in the hosts file, but I'm having trouble
figuring out which numbers go where. If I've got the whole concept
wrong, feel free to tell me that, too.

Oh - running SunOS 4.1.3 - nothing special about it, and I am able
to connect directly to the ISDN modem, via kermit, and dial up the
far end and get connected, but when, after setting things up as I
think they should be, I try to telnet to the remote machine, I get
a "network is unreachable" error.

hoffmanAsked:
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jableyCommented:
The Combinet 2060 has both ethernet and BRI interfaces. It appears from your message that you might have plugged this router into your Sparc 10 using a spare ethernet port (le1), while the rest of your local network is attached to le0.

* If this is the case, then don't - plug everything in to the same ethernet segment, unless you have specific firewalling needs for your local network.

* If you really do need your SPARC 10 and the Combinet connected on their own ethernet segment, make sure you're either using a hub/switch, 10base2 coax cabling (make sure you use terminators), or a 10baseT cross-over cable directly between the two 10baseT ethernet ports.

* From your numbering it does appear that the Combinet is intended to perform a routing function, and not a bridging function. However, if it is expected to act as a bridge, simply plug both bridges into the ethernet networks they are expected to connect (and note that the ISDN link will likely stay up permenantly).

The Combinet 2060 supports RIP version 1, as does your SunOS 4.1.3 machine, and you could simply enable RIP on both Combinets and run routed on the servers - however, this will probably keep your ISDN line permenantly up by the traffic involved in RIP advertisements. If you want to dial-on-demand (eg if you're calling long distance), then you need to disable RIP on the routers, and add the following routes:

1. On the SPARC 10:
  # route add 144.15.0.0 130.150.X.Z 1

2. On the remote machine:
  # route add 130.151.0.0 144.15.A.B 1

You shouldn't need any ifconfig commands, assuming the interfaces on both machines are being used at present (as if they weren't, you wouldn't have IP addresses for them).

You don't give any IP addresses for either end of the ISDN-carried subnet, so I assume these interfaces are effectively unnumbered. If this is the case, the remote ethernet subnet for each router will effectively be learnt as a connected route, and you shouldn't have to configure them further.

If you still have problems, a diagram of your exact setup would be helpful (including subnet masks for all IP addresses).
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hoffmanAuthor Commented:
Is this how to go about asking for clarification of an expert's
answer?


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jableyCommented:
Yes, I think so :)
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hoffmanAuthor Commented:
The machine that the local ISDN box is connected to does have
two separate Ethernet connections - one connected to the local
network, and the other connected directly to the ISDN box. The
way this is supposed to work is that this would isolate the rest
of the network from the traffic coming through the ISDN box, as
well as shielding their network from the brunt of our traffic.

What the intent of the connection is is to, once their machine
is dialed up, make it seem as if our machine is directly on their
network - I'm not clear as to the difference between bridging
and routing, but what we want to be able to do is run, say,
"telnet remote_machine_name" from the local Sparcstation, and
have it connect up automatically. There may be several remote
machines that we'd like to connect to, although I suppose we
could probably do that by logging onto a single remote machine
and going from there to any of their other machines.

I tried the route commands you suggested, and they do get the
ISDN box to autodial, so that part is fixed, so if you could just
explain this routing vs. bridging thing, we could wrap this up.

Thanks for the info so far...

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edwstCommented:
Your local SPARC 10 doesn't know the route to the remote site.
The remote machine doesn't know the route to the local site.
I suggest that you use the 'route add' command on both machines.
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