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Emacs and Fvwm-95 problems

Posted on 1997-05-27
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
Hi!

I don't want it to open the controlpanel and two shell-windows everytime i run startx (and start fvwm-95).
Wher and how do I change  that????
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Question by:hulken
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by:hulken
ID: 1627664
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mlev earned 150 total points
ID: 1627665
From your question, I assume you are using Red Hat 4.*

First, I strongly recommend that you use the control panel to
create an account other than root, and start using that account for purposes other than system administration.

That will put the control panel away.

If you are still bothered with the "shell-windows",
look into /etc/X11/TheNextLevel/.fvwm2rc.init

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