Setting quotas on disk space on SGI.

I am currently looking at setting up limits on how much disk space a user can occupy.  I think I understand how to set up limits on the RAID as a whole, but is there a way I can just set the limit on certain directories, but not others?  For instance, if I don't want a user to have more than 100MB in their home directory, but I don't care how much they have in a shared working directory.  Or, if I want one directory to be limited to 10 MB and another to 100 MB, both on the same file system.  I'd appreciate any help.

Thanks.
randynAsked:
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dhmCommented:
Quotas are either on or off on a filesystem basis; you can't turn them on for just some directories.  This is yet another reason to have partitions on your disk, and I wish those boneheads at SGI would quit shipping single-partition machines and give us some nice partition management tools instead.

Using xlv(7M) (I have it in IRIX-6.2 & 6.4, but not 5.3) you can create "partitions" that you can resize later if necessary.  You could use this functionality to make a filesystem for each directory tree you wish to run quotas on.  Not pretty, but it ought to work.
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