ufsdump parameters for 4mm (DAT) tape

I use the following command line in my backup script for
the first Exabyte 8mm tape drive on sunOS:
/etc/dump 0udsbf 54000 12000 126 /dev/nrst1 /dev/sd3h

What is the corresponding command line for the first SCSI
4mm (DAT) tape drive connected to a SUN Enterprise server
running Solaris 2.5 ?
domino050797Asked:
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jlmsCommented:
/usr/sbin/ufsdump 0ubf 126 /dev/rmt/0un /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s7

Now the explanation:

As you can see the new command is ufsdump.

The options " 0ubf"  mean the same (check man page).

You don't need the options "ds" because the command detect the end of media and combined with the name of the device you use (read next paragraphs) the size and density are implicitly given in the command. Anyway, you can still use these command's opttions.

The tape devices are in /dev/rmt, une number is assigned to each tape, so one tape will have assigned the number 0, the next the number 1 and so on. To specify wich density you are using you write a letter chossen from "l,m,h,c or u" , indicating "low, medium, high, compressed or ultrahigh" densities. If you want to use the non rewind device you append a "n" to the end of the name of the device. Please check the man page for "st" for further details.

About your hard disk partitions, they are named now /dev/dsk/cNtMdXsY
where:
N: number of the scsi controller (0,1,2, etc.)
M:scsi target or ID of your device(valid numbres 0 to 6).
X: usually 0.
Y: number of slice (partition). Old SunOS's partitions (a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h) become numbers (0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7).
Check the sd man page for more details.

Note that your tape could have a different name, if you are unsure remove all the entries in /dev/rmt, shutdown and in the ok> prompt type:
boot -r
this should detect your tape and you will find the right names in place.


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domino050797Author Commented:
Thanks !
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jlmsCommented:
You're welcome.
And by the way, maybe you could rate my answer  so I get some points!
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