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Network DOS-UNIX

Posted on 1997-06-05
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Is it possible to connect two computers, one of them running DOS and the other one running UNIX?, I mean is it possible to connect them as a network?..What I would need in afirmative case?
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Question by:bitrunner
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pxh earned 400 total points
ID: 1812379
The answer is yes.

From the hardware side you need e.g. an ethernet interface
on both machines (twistet pair or coax/cheapernet). Maybe your Unix computer is already equipped with it. For the PC you might need a network card.

The software: there is a low level and a high level part. Concerning the Unix machine, most likely everything you need is already there (maybe you should give more details of which machine you are refering to).

On the PC the low level part, e.g. support for the ethernet hardware should be included with the interface card (make that shure!). On the highlevel part it depends what you want to do. Typically you may want to contact the Unix machine from the PC (telnet, FTP or NFS ...). There is shareware or public domain software for this. Just visit the relevant servers.

If you do not want to pay for ethernet hardware there may be another solution: use PPP or SLIP and a serial cable. I assume that both, your PC and the Unix machine has serial interfaces. You will be limited in speed but in principal this works as well. What you basically do is the same as going on-line to the Internet but instead of using modems you just connect the machines directly.

Your question is very general. I think I gave you at least an overview how to proceed.

Peter (pxh@mpe-garching.mpg.de)

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Expert Comment

by:nleroy
ID: 1812380
Yes, and you have several options.

If I were you, I'd look into Samba.  Samba is a package which
allows your Unix box to look like PC server over the SMB
protocol.  The DOS client is freely available from Microsoft's
server, and works pretty well, but is a memory hog.  The Samba
Unix server is also free and works very well IMHO.   And SMB
client for Windows 3.1 is also available from the Microsoft
home, and WFW 3.1.1 includes one.  You need the TCP/IP protocol
stack installed, also, I think.  I haven't been able to use
a telnet type client through this, but I understand that it
can be done if one has the time and dedication.

I'm not certain if the DOS client can do PPP type links, but I
suspect that it could be tricked into it if all else fails.

Linux (Unix clone for PC's) can also run as an SMB client, if
that would be at all useful to you.

There's also NFS solutions, but AFIK they all cost $, such as
Sun's PC-NFS, but do work well, also.  I've run into some
permission type problems running these types of packages,
however... NFS was designed to connect Unix boxes, and it shows
in its design.

Hope this helps.

-Nick (nick.leroy@norland.com)
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