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How to route TCPIP packets via RAS

Posted on 1997-06-17
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Last Modified: 2013-12-28
I have an RAS Client which connects to an NT RAS Server.  On the RAS Server, if the IP Forwarding is turned off, the RAS Client is unable to send TCPIP packets correctly through the  RAS to the Network which the RAS Server is connected to.  I am unable to turn on the Static IP Routing (i.e. via the Control Panel/Networking/TCPIP/Routing) because it causes problems with other routers on the corporate network.  Am I missing something.  I would think that the RAS Server should be able to forward TCPIP packets from the RAS Client correctly without turning on the IP Forwarding (i.e. Static Routes or something??)  Both IPX and NetBeui appear to work correctly w/o IP Forwarding enabled.  Here is some information about my configuration

RAS Client:
     NT Workstation running 4.0
     Requesting NetBeui, IPX, and TCPIP
     TCPIP information (i.e. IP Address, gateway address, etc) being assigned by RAS Server

RAS Server:
     NT Server version 4.0
     TCPIP, NetBeui, and IPX protocols enabled
     Using Pool of TCPIP addresses (13.1.2.1 - 13.1.2.16)
     TCPIP address of Network Card (13.1.0.72)
     Subnet Mask (255.255.252.0)
     
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Question by:dhoman
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3 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:davidzon
ID: 1778921
Your answer is a proxy server, best one is MS Proxy Server

Nice And Easy

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Author Comment

by:dhoman
ID: 1778922
I am unfamiliar with how the proxy server will help.  I assume the proxy server is setup on the RAS Server.  How does the proxy server route the TCPIP packets from the RAS Clients.
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Accepted Solution

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deanf earned 200 total points
ID: 1778923
The problem looks like a subnet error. 255.255.252.0 is a 2 Address class B subnet.

The addresses you give are seperated by a class B range of 3 addresses and so it would be treated as a seperate network. I am not at all convinced that the addresses you are trying to use are actually valid for that subnet (I think the first valid address would be 13.1.5.0) however I could be wrong on that.

If this sounds plausible, but you are still unsure where to go next, If you can let me know the details of the breakdown of subnets within your organisation I should be able to clarify this for you.

Dean
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