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rpm on non RedHat system interacts with ldconfig

Posted on 1997-06-19
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I am upgrading a linux 486 system running Slackware 3.0 and kernel 1.3.59 with umsdos, which I need because of the hard disk configuration.

I have used rpm to upgrade libc.so.5 and tell rpm that libdb.so.2.0.0 was present.

As a result ldconfig now reports errors.

I have more details of the problem available.

I want to know

1.  How to use rpm without messing up my system
2.  How to get the system to recognise the new version of     libc.so.5
3.  What further actions and upgrades are needed.

Please note that telling me to use RedHat is not an answer unless they will support use of umsdos.
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Question by:chemical
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Author Comment

by:chemical
ID: 1628271
I now know that part of the problem is a bug in an out of date version of ldconfig, so I will update this.  I have also found the GCC HOWTO for linux which explains a lot about how dynamic loading and why things are organised the way they are.

I have details of the error messages available.

I still want to know what action to take to get a stable system.
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feenix earned 100 total points
ID: 1628272
First of all, RedHat has umsdos support. Second, why are you using so old kernel and a development version?

The problems may be because the links to libc are old and ldconfig can't find them. Try to remove all libc.so -files that are links and then run ldconfig. That way it should fix the links and everything should work just fine.
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Author Comment

by:chemical
ID: 1628273
Thank you, feenix.  Answers to your questions.

1.  I boot using ldconfig from DOS direct to a umsdos root.  I have no unix partition.  My BIOS will not support any other setup at present.  I don't think RedHat regard this as something they are interested in.  Their kernel does support umsdos file system and they have an rpm for umstools, on which basis I can use the kernel they supply in their distribution.

2.  The kernel I am using is the one advised by Jacques Gelinas, who wrote umsdos, at the time I installed.  After I had tweaked it for my CDROM and fixed a bug it has worked well.  I now want to upgrade it to a 2.0.x version.  I have a CDROM RedHat distribution where the tools are all in rpms, so my first step is to install rpm, which needs also libc etc.  So I am installing what rpm asks for and this is conflicting with the old ldconfig.  I could put in a new ldconfig but which one?  There is a 1.7.14 in the RedHat and a 1.9.something also available.

When I get error messages saying that it is trying to unlink usr/lib I get cautious and ask for help.

Since I aske the question I have looked at the GCC Howto and uncovered some information about the intended operations of ldconfig.

So as much as anything it is advice about which versions of what I should now use.

As I said before I have some evidence about the ldconfig failure available.

Also, I was following advice from the rpm list that rather than install an rpm file by over-riding its requirements it was better  to load the other rpms too.  That was the cause of my problems.  My experience has been that queries of this sort do not get a response on the rpm-list because they are developing rpm.
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