Array of TextFields hangs applet

I've created an array of TextFields, to simplify field-population in an applet.  In my init() method, I can 'setText()',  get 'myTextField[i].length()', whatever.  Any TextField method works as advertized, so I've allocated and instantiated it properly.  But once my event handler calls *any other method in my class*, 'myTextField[i]' becomes a black hole: the debugger (visual cafe's) won't show its
value and the execution seems to fix on any line with a reference to it (as if it was in an infinite loop).  Any TextField method, called from any of my methods,  (i.e.:"myTextField[0].setText()" ) produces the same
result.  If I hadn't declared it as "global" to my class, I'd suspect scope-trouble.  What am I doing wrong?!!

Sample:

public class URLApplet extends Applet {

    int i;
    java.awt.TextField myTextField[];

 public void init() {
  super.init();

        TextField myTextField[] = new TextField[8];

        for (i=0; i < myTextField.length; i++) {       //works just fine
           myTextField[i] = new TextField();
        }
        myTextField[0].reshape(156,36,331,23);       //works just fine
        //...etc...

        for (i=0; i < myTextField.length; i++) {         //works just fine
            add(myTextField[i]); //works just fine
        }
        myTextField[0].setText("succeeds");             //works just fine, here!!!
 }

 private void clearScreen() {

        for (i=0; i < 6; i++) {
           myTextField[i].setText(" ");                       //*hangs here*
        }
 }

 public void populateTextFields() {
     int token = 0;
     try {
         URL urlObject = new URL("http://etc.com/cgi-bin/foo" + myTextField[8].getText());                                     //*hangs here*
            URLConnection agent = urlObject.openConnection();
            InputStreamReader(agent.getInputStream());
            StreamTokenizer stDealer = new
StreamTokenizer(agent.getInputStream());
            int tokenType = st.nextToken();
            int elems = myTextField[0].length               //*hangs here*
            for (i=0; i < elems; i++) {
//*hangs here*
                myTextField[i].setText(st.sval);               //*hangs here*
                tokenType = st.nextToken();
            } catch { blah, blah, blah;}

 public boolean action (Event e, Object o) {

     if (e.target instanceof Button || e.target instanceof TextField) {
     //if (e.target instanceof Button) {
   try {
       clearScreen();                //*never comes back*
       stopWatch();
       populateTextFields();         //*never comes back*

          } catch (Exception x) {
             System.out.print(x);
            }
        }
    return true;
    }
}

pwicksAsked:
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jaigerCommented:
sounds to me like a synchronization problem.  

you may not be dealing with an infinite loop but actually a thread blocking on some sort of mutex semaphore.

try wrapping all references to the text field array, after init(), in synchronized blocks.  

you could also try using a Vector instead of an array (?) since Vectors tend to be somewhat synchronized.
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pwicksAuthor Commented:
This synchronization notion is worth noting, but two other responses have arrived this morning via E-mail indicating that I had allocated a second array when I thought I was instantiating the original array:

java.awt.TextField myTextField[];//declares array (method global)
TextField myTextField[] = new TextField[8]; //declares (redundantly) and initializes, but local to the init() method!

/* -- this is a *second* array. Since I hadn't initialized the original array, I was trying to use an array which was null. This caused the "black hole" effect, although I expected better of Java. Perhaps this is where syncronization would help.
it should read: */

myTextField[] = new TextField[8]; //instantiates original array.

Problem solved. Lesson learned. Thanks to all who responded and good luck to all who this "object lesson" may help.
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