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Setting up a PPP WAN with Solaris 2.5

Posted on 1997-06-25
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Last Modified: 2013-12-23
This is the scenario: Dialin server = Ultra 3000
Remote offices = Sparcstation5 (9ea) all systems running
Solaris 2.5.1
Configuration:
The Remote systems will be connected to the main office through the use of dedicated routers, DSU/CSU'S, and Private Virtual Circuits provided by our telephone exchange utility. Each Sparcstation will be attached to it's own LAN.
Each remote system will have its own direct link to the
main office via this same type of configuration described
above.

1.] To which physical device on the LAN would the router be
    connected? Connect the routers together? How?
2.] OK
3.] What kind of connection (cable) is needed to connect the     Sun to the router. Which port is used on the Sun.
4.] I know each physical network needs a unique network     address, but does the new WAN created by linking the
    Sun workstations need a seperate and unique network     address? How do you subnet a class C address (Example)?
5.] OK

Thanks in advance for yout help!
Knowledge is power, but it is only useful if it is shared!
Denmark

P.S. How do you add an IP address to a dedicated router
     (CISCO)?
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Question by:denmarkw
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6 Comments
 
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Accepted Solution

by:
n0thing earned 220 total points
ID: 1582161
Hi,

   This's a moderatly complex network design. I hope what you meant is connect each office to the central office using a dedicated line ... not a "dial-in" line.

1- If each of the office has its own LAN. The order would be to install a large router (Cisco 7000 series) at your central office and connect it to your LAN.
Then install routers at remote site and connect them together.

2- For CSU/DSU, i allways use Digital Link's and routers, i would
recomend Cisco.

3- None, your Sparc are already connected to the LAN, simply add
a router to it to route WAN traffic.

4- Yes, each network must have its own and unique IP address, provided you don't use private address which must be routed thru
a NAT (Network Address Translation) Device, however if your remote site doesn't have a large number of devices, you could subnet a Class C address and use it at each smaller site.

5- Guess not.

   There're many technical details involved in the design of
your network and can't be explained here. It'll take too long.

Good luck,
Minh Lai

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Author Comment

by:denmarkw
ID: 1582162
Edited text of question
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Expert Comment

by:n0thing
ID: 1582163
1- The router will be connected to your Hubs.
2- The Sun will be connected to the hub the router too, they'll be on the same segment.
3- I would recommend to get a separate class C address for each location. It's easier than to Subnet a Class C and in the future if you plan to add more stations to your network, it'll be easier to upgrade. Each device on the network needs a separate and unique IP address. For an example of subnetting a Class C address. Click on my user ID (n0thing), it's already answer under Subnetting Class C.

Check www.cisco.com for more information regarding network design.

Regards,
Minh Lai
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Author Comment

by:denmarkw
ID: 1582164
Edited text of question
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Author Comment

by:denmarkw
ID: 1582165
Thanks for your patience n0thing!
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LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:n0thing
ID: 1582166
If you buy a new router, upon booting up. It will ask for IP addr. and various other options. It's complex depending on your routing algorithme you want to use RIP, IRGP, EIGRP, BGP, OSPF.
I would recommend you to consult a network engineer. It will save
you alot of time & troubles later on. Router configuration is
not an easy task.

Regards,
n0thing
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