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c++ dll and Visual Basic 5.0

I'm trying to write a dll that will work in VB 5.0.
I just tried to write a simple "hello world" function in
the dll and it worked when I called the dll from another
c++ program, but not vb.  

Basically, here is my code.

c++
------
#define DLL_EXPORT __declspec(dllexport)

extern "C"
DLL_EXPORT int TestText(char* out)
{
 strcpy(out, "Hello world");
 return 1;
}

vb 5.0 - form1
---------------------
Private Sub Command1_Click()
    Dim Text2 As String * 20
    Dim ret As Integer
   
    ret = TestText(Text2)
    MsgBox Text2
End Sub

vb5.0 module1.bas
-----------------------------
Declare Function TestText Lib "mime.dll" (ByRef sHold As String) As Long
0
ivanh
Asked:
ivanh
1 Solution
 
md041797Commented:
Just a guess.  Basic strings and c strings are different.  Basic stores a count byte before the text.  c strings are zero delimited.
0
 
mjkajenCommented:
Strings in VB5 are not represented as they are in Microsoft C++. In VB5, strings are stored in a structure that is invisible to the programmer called a VARIANT. The VARIANT represents a variant union, and the type in the union to represent string on the C++ side is called BSTR. See the Microsoft help on BSTR. One has to allocate and de-allocate BSTR strings as one would normal memory.

The C++ program should look something like:

DLL_EXPORT int TestText (BSTR *pbstrOut)
{
   *pbstrOut = SysAllocString (L"Hello World");
 if (*pbstrOut == NULL)
    return 0; // didn't get any space for string.
else
   return 1;
}

BSTR is a built-in Microsoft type the prefixes string with the length AND zero  byte terminates them.  There are a number of "SYS..." functions to manipulate BSTR's. SysAllocString allocates space for the argument, and does a string copy of the argument to the allocated space.

I believe your VB program should work as is.  

Good luck, MK.
0
 
ivanhAuthor Commented:
I tried what you said, but VB keeps telling me
  Error '49':  Bad DLL calling convention


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rmichelsCommented:
Try changing the ByRef keyword in your Declare statement for the string parameter to a ByVal.  This is how you deal with char * paramaters (and it does not pass by val, but converts strings to/from C ASCIIZ still passing ByRef)

0
 
ivanhAuthor Commented:
So you are saying to use my first code and just change
from byref to byval?  I tried that and still got the 49 error.
I also tried with the modified code and recieved the same 49
error.
0
 
rmichelsCommented:
what compiler are you using?  I know that newer microsoft compilers will dork with the C function name appended and @ and a number (I think the number of bytes on that paramater stack?). I don't have a C++ compiler here rite now, so I can't figure it out.  I think maybe the calling convention for your function may be incorrect. Sorry I can't give you an exact answer..it's been a few years since I wrote DLL's for VB and things have changed some, at least in MSVC

0
 
ivanhAuthor Commented:
I'm using MSVC 5.0.  
0
 
GrobyCommented:
Error 49 indicates that you're using the wrong calling convention for your function.

Your function should not be declared extern "C" (which, by the way, should rather be __cdecl) but __pascal

If you're using VC++4.2 or above, use WINAPI instead of __pascal

So the prototype should read
DLL_EXPORT WINAPI int TestText(LPSTR *p)
or
DLL_EXPORT __pascal int TestText(LPSTR *p)

And your VB declaration should be

Declare Function TestText Lib "mime.dll" (ByVal sHold As String) As Long
Hope this helps,
  Robert
0
 
ivanhAuthor Commented:
Actually, the first answer was right, but Groby's answer is
really the one I was looking for.  
My real big problem was that I didn't have a def file.
I also found out out that doing a ByVal, you can use LPSTR and
if you are doing a ByRef you have to use BSTR.  But this
is what you guys demonstrated in your code, but I just didn't
make the connection until I started reading some docs.  
Thanks all for the help.  I learned a lot!
0
 
unamigoCommented:
Hi, I'm trying to make a dll and I'm looking for some help with this. I tried what you say here but didn't work, this is how I declared the function in VB:

Private Declare Function copystrings Lib "O:\mypath\usuarios.dll" (ByVal Dest As String, ByVal Source As String)


This is my dll code:



//usuarios.def
LIBRARY usuarios.dll
EXPORTS
copystrings               @1





// Usuarios.cpp : Defines the entry point for the DLL application.
//

/*  
      A2CW       (LPCSTR)  -> (LPCWSTR)
      A2W        (LPCSTR)  -> (LPWSTR)
      W2CA       (LPCWSTR) -> (LPCSTR)
      W2A        (LPCWSTR) -> (LPSTR)
*/

//#include <afxpriv.h>
#include "stdafx.h"

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <windows.h>
#include <wchar.h>
#include <winerror.h>
#include <lmcons.h>
#include <lmaccess.h>
#include <lmapibuf.h>
#include <ole2.h>

#define DllExport __declspec(dllexport)

BOOL APIENTRY DllMain( HANDLE hModule,
                       DWORD  ul_reason_for_call,
                       LPVOID lpReserved
                               )
{
    return TRUE;
}




DllExport PASCAL copystrings( char* dest, char* src )
{
//      wcscpy(dest,src);
      return 1;
}

Can you tell me what's wrong, please?

Thanks in advanced.

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