Solved

Using a non-ATAPI CDROM

Posted on 1997-07-08
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
Hi,

I have a 2x CDROM drive which I would like to use with Linux (Redhat
4.2)

I have little documentation with it, but it appears to be from a
 company called Bluepoint and they call it an ICD-300 (it has a Philips
mechanism, and an Oak Technology interface chip). Bluepoints docs state
that it is a non-ATAPI IDE drive. I have tried searching the web for
info, but have failed completely.

I have used it successfully with Win95, as I have a driver on disk
(which appears to be written by from Oak technology).

Linux however completely fails to detect it as an IDE CDROM (I presume
because it is non-ATAPI).

Is there any hope this can ever work with Linux?? Does anyone else
have a non-ATAPI CDROM ?? Should I just bin it and buy a new one
(I hate doing that!!)

Cheers

Warren
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Question by:frostw
2 Comments
 

Expert Comment

by:deatsch
ID: 1628573
Warren,
Read the Howto's from your Redhat install.  The one you want is CDrom howto.  I'm not sure on the capitilzation though.
Take a look at /usr/src/linux/Documentation/cdrom.
It's possible you will have to recomplie the kernel.
Jim
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LVL 2

Accepted Solution

by:
cedric earned 50 total points
ID: 1628574
Hy,
you have to recompile your kernel for this.
go to your /usr/src/linux and type make menuconfig
go to the CDROM drivers and check all the boxes.
compile and install your new kernel, reboot and watch the messages. Or less /var/log/messages or dmesg. and look for your cdrom beeing recognized. Then uncheck all the other boxes in the kernel configuration (all but your cdrom driver).
And you should be ok.

Byby
0

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