Partition Numbering With Win95

I have just bought a new Gateway with a 6.4 Gb HD and
Windows 95 already preinstalled.   I repartitioned my hard
drive with Partition Magic so that I have one primary (C:) and one extended partition with 3 logicals contained within.
I also have about a gig of free space.  When I was partitioning my hard dirve in the linux setup, I created one primary (/) and three logical partitions (swap, /usr, and /home).  Linux (Red Hat 4.2) then would not let me install, saying something about a bad argument.  I rebooted and ran the installation again, and saw that linux had only created 3 of the four partitions.  I rebooted again and ran Partition Magic and saw a bif fat error 120, meaning that
the logical drive chain is incompatible.  It said that the chain should be in ascending order, but that some versions of linux create them in the order that they were created.  Windows 95 seemed to run OK but I could not run Dos's FDISK for the life of me.  My question is as thus:  Where on the drive should I put my linux logical partitions and what should I number them (hda6, hda7, and hda8 are already taken)?  Also, how many partitions can an extended contain?  Where should I put my linux primary in relation to my Win 95 dirves?  Will the fact that I am using FAT32 make a difference, and if so, what.  I would appreciate any help that anyone could post for me.
Thanks

PS-Using Partition Magic, I can put my free space anywhere.
SylverAsked:
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cedricCommented:
Hello,

on a hard drive, you can have only 4 primary partitions. So it's normal that linux complains about creating a 5" one.

So you have 2 primary with win95, 2 free for linux.
i suggest you to use only one for the all stuff and one for the swap. Or one for the / and one for the /usr and swap to a file.

Btw, be careful with Partition Magic, some versions have big big bugs in it and can damage all your data.

Byby
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SylverAuthor Commented:
I did not say that I created 3 primary partitions, but that I created ONE primary (/) and three LOGICAL partitions, giving me a grand total of 3 primary/extended partitions.  My question was more geared toward where I should put the partitions physically, at the beginning or end of the extended partition, and what should I number them as.  Ditto for the primary, where should it go?
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cedricCommented:
OK, here is how i recommand you to partition your hard drive.
hda1 : dos (or win 95)
hda2 : linux /
hda3 : linux /usr
hda4 : linux swap
the size of each partition is yours. But all this one should be
primary partition, not extended or logical, cauz if...you could get into trouble.

you can also try something like this in your /etc/lilo.conf if you really have trouble with your bios / Ide controller detection. I suggest you to use the mbr of hda to install lilo.

btw i suggest you to use lilo 20.
--------------------------------------
boot = /dev/hda
map = /lilo-map
delay = 100
ramdisk = 0             # Turns off the ramdisk in the Slackware kernel
timeout = 100
prompt
disk = /dev/hda         # BIOS only sees first 500 MB.
   bios=0x80            # specifies the first IDE.
   sectors = 63         # get these numbers from your drive's documentation.
   heads = 16
   cylinders = 2100
image = /vmlinuz
  append = "hd=2100,16,63"  # This may be redundant.
  root = /dev/hda2
  label = linux
  read-only
  vga = extended
other = /dev/hda1
  label = msdos
  table = /dev/hda
  loader = /boot/chain.b


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