HTML 4.0: Read-only stops others from copying your stuff?

HTML 4.0 specification
-------------------------------------
I know that that it enables us to have read-only objects. But, I would like to know, does it stop others from downloading images from your site?
This is what I heard from a mailing list:-
> > > > > The coming HTML 4.0 version enables you to mark your files as
> > > "Read-Only"
> > > > > so people won't be able to "grab" your files; however, 3.2
doesn't
> > > > support
> > > > > that feature and which means you gotta "let it be" for the time
> > being.

However, as I see it, readonly means prevent the files from being modified. Since it can be read, it can be copied, aint it? For example, in the Windows 95 environment, when a file is readonly, it can still be copied to another location, isn't it? So, how actually does it prevent others from grabbing your files?
Thus, I would like to know, does it really prevent others from grabbing your files? Please kindly give your comments. Thank you.
tatAsked:
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jshamlinCommented:
I think you've been misled by a person who needs to read things a little more slowly <g>

All WWW documents are "read only" in that, unless a user has FTP or LAN access to your Web files, s/he can only read them (and not make alterations).  

This doesn't prevent file-grabbing, though - and really, there is no way to allow the user to read your document without allowing them to make a copy (which they can then modify on their own hard drive and post elsewhere on the Net).

What HTML 4.0 *will* provide is a way to prevent the user from *cacheing files* - this is important if your site has dynamic content, to ensure that when the user loads a template file (with content dynalmically loaded), entirely new content is loaded "fresh" from the source rather than using the previously cached version, which will still contain "stale" content.

As for "snag-proofing," don't expect to see that anytime soon - if it's important to keep material from being copied, don't make it publicly available - or follow the "analog" route: register  copyright/trademark to protect your material.
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tatAuthor Commented:
Yes, I love your answer.
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