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Linux Box acting as a ROUTER is going down. Why?

Hi,

    I have a Linux Box acting as router. I'm using the routed that comes
with RedHat 4.2.
    This machine is going down very often. It's running on a 486-100Mhz
with 8Mb (I've  tried with 40Mb - without good results).

    Does anyone have a clue about what could be the problem?

Thanks, in advance

                Sergio Sousa

0
sergiom
Asked:
sergiom
1 Solution
 
cedricCommented:
Hy,
could you tell us a little bit more about your config and what append exactly ?
By.
0
 
sergiomAuthor Commented:
I'm using:
RedHat 4.2
Kernel 2.0.30 (Re-compiled)
2 Ethernet Adapters Ne2000 Compatible (ISA - 10Mbps)
Vga Adapter Vesa Local Bus
8 Mb Ram
Off-Board IDE Controler
The ROUTED that comes with the RedHat 4.2

If anyone wants to know something in particular please ask me!

Thanks,
             Sergio Sousa
0
 
will031697Commented:
Why are you using routed? (this is a trick question -- you probably don't need to be running it)

Define "going down"; it could mean:
  -hard lock
  -ether interface going down
  -routed process dying

Describe your network topology -- which IP network(s) do you have on each ethernet interface?
Show us the output of 'netstat -i' and 'netstat -nr'
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zhanghjCommented:
When I use 2 Ne2000 compatible adapters under kernel 1.2.1, the system alway lock up. After I change the network adapter to
3Com 509 card, all is ok now.
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q721kjhCommented:
There are many reasons your machine could be going down.  You may have anything from a software problem to an interrupt conflict to bad memory or an overheating CPU.

To eliminate routed as the problem, disable it by commenting it out in the rc file in which it is invoked.  Replace it with static routes.  These are routes you enter yourself using the "route add..." command.  Once you enter the route, it remains as an entry in the routing table until you (or something, like pppd, in certain cases) deletes it (with a "route del..." command.  To see the effect of the route commands on the routing table, use netstat -nr or route to view the routing table.  (You should copy down the existing routing table before you start, as a reference.)

Once you get the hang of it, you should be able to describe all of your routes.  Since you have only two ethernet cards, I presume that your machine is acting as a gateway to the internet for some machines hanging off the other card.  In this case, the routes generally never change, so you don't need routed.  If your router is advertising its subnet to the router above it, ask the sysadmin of that router to make static entries into that router for the time being.

If this does not eliminate routed, then you have a divide-and-conquer problem on your hands.  The best way to start is to strip the system down to a bare minimum and build it up until the problem occurs again, then suspect the last change you made.  If that doesn't help, tear it down again, and build it up in a different way.  For all the time you are going to spend on this problem, you might just want to pick up another machine for a few hundred bucks and bring it online.  I have been using 486-33's for routers with two ethernet cards and multiple modems for dial-in, and have always had tons of CPU time to spare.
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