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messed up file system

Posted on 1997-07-19
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Last Modified: 2008-03-17
fsck finds uncorrectable errors in my / system (short read
during inode scan) and some files seem to be missing.  The
system seems to boot ok and everything I normally use seems
to work.  Is there anything I can do short of re-installing?
I'm running Redhat 4.0 (with some upgrades) and kernel 2.0.30.
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Question by:tennent
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Author Comment

by:tennent
ID: 1626493
Edited text of question
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Accepted Solution

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ahoffmann earned 100 total points
ID: 1626494
look at /lost+found
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Author Comment

by:tennent
ID: 1626495
I presume the missing files might be at /lost+found
But the real problem is restoring file system integrity.
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Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 1626496
AFAIK fsck is the only way to restores the file system, just
leaving in /lost+found what cannot be repaired. If fsck still
complains you may call it interactively and correct some errors
by hand.
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