Solved

Processor

Posted on 1997-08-07
5
309 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-16
This question actually dos'nt belong here, but :

I am building my own 8-bit computer, but I do'nt know witch processor is (easiest) best to use. Please tell me witch you think is best and why.
I also need to store an program in an EPROM and for that purpose I need an croscompiler from pascal or any other high level langues to the prosessors maschin langues. Where can I download this program?
0
Comment
Question by:hp080797
  • 3
5 Comments
 

Expert Comment

by:manic
ID: 1215398
Try the 8086, TASM will do it and you should be able to get a nice easy Micro controller version by now... Psion used the V30 which is a 8086 rip-off in their Series 3x organisers..

Failing that the Z80 now comes as the Z8000 microcontroller but a hot favourite is probably a PIC microcontroller, Cheap, really easy and easy to program with software kits available from all sorts of place (here in the UK I might try, for example, Maplin Electronics).
0
 

Expert Comment

by:manic
ID: 1215399
P.S. I know you want to use a high level language but you will have trouble doing that as they depend on Operating System specific calls... (On DOS systems, they use Int 21h for example...). Assembly is easy really - just takes practice. Get a book.
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:kellyjj
ID: 1215400
I would go with a PIC myself.  However, there many good and cheap controllers out there. I think Texas Instrument has one.  As far as a High level language, with what it sounds like you are trying to do, assembler would work better.  It does not take up as much, and it can be used with any processor.  You just need a programer's guide for that processor.
0
 

Author Comment

by:hp080797
ID: 1215401
Sorry but the 8086 is an 16-bit prossessor, but maby that is better. Please tell me why, and I will give an great grade.
0
 

Accepted Solution

by:
manic earned 100 total points
ID: 1215402
Your right, it is 16bit. It is also readily available, cheap and considerably more powerful than the 8bit offerings, there is a HUGE amount of documentation on it. It should also make it easier to deal with numbers larger than 255 as you have 16bit machine words.  Using the 8086 would allow you to develop the programs on your  PC without having to buy very expensive processor emulators or keep reprogramming ROMS.

There is a compromise. You could use an 8088 which (correct me if I'm wrong out their) is a 16bit processor trapped behind an 8bit interface. It was used in the original IBM PC.

The PIC is 8bit.  The venerable Z80 is 8bit (and found in cash machines and airliners).

As you have probably guessed, this is a little out of my field (i'm a networking and linux bod), but you have my opinion.

If you want to be able to do things easily however with hardly any support logic and really easy programming, use a PIC.
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Path Explorer

An intuitive utility to help find the CSS path to UI elements on a webpage. These paths are used frequently in a variety of front-end development and QA automation tasks.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Azure Functions is a solution for easily running small pieces of code, or "functions," in the cloud. This article shows how to create one of these functions to write directly to Azure Table Storage.
This article demonstrates probably the easiest way to configure domain-wide tier isolation within Active Directory. If you do not know tier isolation read https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server-docs/security/securing-privileged-access/s…
A short tutorial showing how to set up an email signature in Outlook on the Web (previously known as OWA). For free email signatures designs, visit https://www.mail-signatures.com/articles/signature-templates/?sts=6651 If you want to manage em…

679 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question