Deriving a CStatic so it will not paint a specific color...

I want to derive a CStatic class so that it will not display a specific color when  a bitmap is assigned to it.  Should I do this in OnPaint()?  Basically, I've got some bitmaps with a white background that I want to make transparent when it is displayed in a CStatic control.

Source examples are needed and appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
   Dave
David GrayAsked:
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kaelinCommented:
Dave,

You cannot derive and do your own drawing with a CStatic control,
because the underlying Windows control does not support an
owner-draw flag.  You could do a CButton or CListCtrl, however
there's not much point in deriving from any of these anyway
because a CStatic control is the simplest control there is.
Just make your own replacement class derived directly from CWnd,
and then draw your bitmap from OnPaint.

"Masking" the image to make one color transparent is another
matter.  The easiest way to do this is to convert your bitmaps
to icons and then use CDC::DrawIcon to paint them.  What an
icon has that a bitmap lacks is a mask, which is simply an extra
1-bit deep bitmap where off bits are treated as transparent
parts of the image.  You can easily convert bitmaps to icons
using Developer Studio's resource editor.  Create a new icon resource of the desired size, and then paste the bitmap from the
clipboard and change the areas you want transparent to the
icon's "background" color in the editor.

If for some reason you don't want to let DrawIcon do all the
work, the function to check out is CDC::BitBlt.  It will take
multiple BitBlt calls to do the same thing, with various ROP
codes in a specific order (I don't recall the details off the
top of my head).

I hope you find these tips useful.
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David GrayAuthor Commented:
How can you make a icon of a desired size to fit the the size of the bitmap, when I tried before it seemed like it would only let me have the standard 32x32 size.  If I could use the icon class to display bitmaps, this is a totally acceptable solution, if you know a way to make the allowable size for an icon larger.

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David GrayAuthor Commented:
Never mind my previous comment, I just discovered the way to customize the size of an icon.  I never noticed the little toolbar icon that allows you to choose a specific size.

Thanks for you help,
    Dave
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