Cabling; UTP and USOC

Has anyone dealt with USOC (Universal Service Order Code) cabling and converting USOC to UTP for a 10Base-T network?
My office was wired using USOC and I want to install a 10Base-T network.  

Thanks
SDW
sdwixAsked:
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mearley081497Connect With a Mentor Commented:
Pulling new wires it what the companies in my situation have done (expensive), but you can try the suggestion below in an afternoon:

Unshielded Twisted Pair wiring has a very simple specificattion for which most wiring will word provided that it is not capacitivly loaded or of high impedance (that is the wire does not act like a capacitor and store any significant amount of charge, and the resistance is low, less than a few ohms per 100 feet).

UTP comes in many categories, the common ones are:

CAT 1  1 twists per inch  used for telephones, may not even be                                                                               twisted

CAT 3  3 twists per inch  not used unless you want to save money and plan to stay below 10 MBits/second

CAT 5  5 twists per inch  Primarily used today, good up to 100 MBits/second - some NICS and switches can run Gigabit over this wire.

All the above wires have 4 twisted pairs, for a total of 8 wires.  When connecting you must use a twisted pair for each comm channel.  For simplex mode (one channel) you need 1 pair, for duplex you need 2 pairs.  Some networks need all 4 pairs for alternate comm channels.

So in short:  If your current wire meets the above specifications at a minimum, you can try by cutting off the connectors which are atached now and installing a couple of RJ45 connectors, being sure to get the pairs right - this is any network manual.

Choose the LONGEST run in your office and be sure to go through a HUB or reverse the pairing so that the Xmit and Recv channels are crossed - this is called a crossover cable and is used for two computers and only two computers or for connecting hubs.

If you are able to transfer large files and remote applications you will most-likely be ok.  To be sure have your wires tested with a UTP tester (these are expensive so you will need to have a CAT5 electrician or Net Consultant come in and do it).

-Matthew
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barthollisCommented:
For stability of your system, I feel you would be well advised to pull new Cat 5 wiring.
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