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Mac OS 8 and #%$*&!!!! sticky menus

Posted on 1997-08-15
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
Does anybody know of a way to turn off those damn sticky menus?

Thanks,
-Doug
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Question by:Doug032697
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10 Comments
 

Expert Comment

by:slinkyslug
ID: 1537419
Why? You can use them just like old if you hold down the mouse button.
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Expert Comment

by:weed
ID: 1537420
I dunno...i kinda LIKE those damn sticky menus..heh
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Author Comment

by:Doug032697
ID: 1537421
I *know* I can use them like the old ones if I hold down the mouse button... but I don't want to have to hold it down long enough, especially when there's other system activity going on, since I then have to hold it down for several seconds sometimes.
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Expert Comment

by:weed
ID: 1537422
uhm...no ya dont. just pretend theyre NORMAL menus...they work the same...the problem is in your head thinking these menus are different.
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Author Comment

by:Doug032697
ID: 1537423
That works fine for the standard menus, most of the time (if I press, pull down, and release before the menu appears - not hard to do when Nutscape is thinking, or pretending to, about something - I get nothing instead of the selection I used to get), but not for pop-ups.  In particular, there are some pop-ups in which I would *like* to be able to quickly select the current selection with a quick press-and-release.  The sticky menus get in the way, leaving me staring at a pop-up menu when the selection *should* have already been made.

For that matter, it irks me that they behave inconsistently - most notably, sub-menus *aren't* sticky!  Why, oh, WHY, did they make pop-ups sticky and sub-menus non-sticky when the reverse would have made so much more sense?

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Expert Comment

by:weed
ID: 1537424
youre confused about the function of sticky menus....they work the SAME as normal menus...you can use them the same as normal menus...they work the SAME way. click, drag to the menu item, release....EXACTLY the same.
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Author Comment

by:Doug032697
ID: 1537425
That's exactly my point... they DON'T work the same way, especially in the case of pop-up menus where I want to re-select the previous selection.  In previous OSes, I could simply click and release on the pop-up menu and the event would be sent off to the application.  Now, if I don't wait to release for however long the system thinks I should (which varies greatly), I end up with a pop-up menu staring me in the face because the stickiness was activated.  This is *NOT* the same as what used to happen.
You might well argue that this is bad interface design on the part of the designer who used pop-up menus in this fashion (and, frankly, I wouldn't argue with you if you did B^), but the point is that the new menu behavior impedes this functionality.

Also, in "standard" menus from the menu bar, if I select a menu and then quickly decide that that wasn't what I really wanted, I (again) must WAIT for however long the system thinks I should to release the mouse button (or make an extra click somewhere else) before it will go away, whereas I used to be able to release the button as quickly as I wanted to and the menu would just go away.  This is *NOT* the same as what used to happen.

There's also the little issue of Windoze users expecting (and rightfully so, IMO) sub-menus to be just as sticky as the main menu, which they aren't in OS 8.  Fortunately, confusion seems to be the natural state of a Windoze user anyway, so that's not really any big deal.  B^)  Furthermore, the sticky menus weaken the grab-release metaphor that has always accompanied mouse button press and release, respectively, and are thus a Bad Thing (TM) under the Human Interface Guidelines.  Maybe I'll write Apple a nasty note about how they didn't follow their own guidelines.

So, no, the sticky menus don't work the same as normal menus, because if they did there wouldn't be a new name for them.  B^)  I don't like the new menu behavior (which both my wife and I do find to be noticeably and irritatingly different), and my original question stands:  is there any way to go back to the old behavior, short of installing the old system?

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Expert Comment

by:weed
ID: 1537426
well im still tellin you theyre the same if you use them the same way but oooook....and no theres currently no way to get rid of em.
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Accepted Solution

by:
weed earned 200 total points
ID: 1537427
ok heres your fix. just came across this 30 seconds ago. http://hyperarchive.lcs.mit.edu/HyperArchive/Archive/cfg/teflon-2.hqx....teflon is a controll panel that kills the sticky menus. its brand new as it was just posted to a web page.
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Author Comment

by:Doug032697
ID: 1537428
Thanks!  Looks like that's exactly what I want.

-Doug

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