Solved

chown, chgrp and chomd --- extra features and functionality

Posted on 1997-08-15
8
450 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-22
Besides the usual functions that chown , chgrp and chmod can perform (which is mentioned in man pages), is there any other hidden features and functions of the 3 commands mentioned above. (eg. history, sercurity, etc.)
0
Comment
Question by:mwche2
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
8 Comments
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 2006652
Depends on the flavour of your UNIX, some don't describe that you can change owner and group with one call: just by calling chown.

To answer your question in details, one need to know what your man pages say about those commands.
0
 

Expert Comment

by:bombadil
ID: 2006653
Which OS?
0
 

Author Comment

by:mwche2
ID: 2006654
All flavours of UNIX (Linux, Ultrixs, Solaris, BSD, System V(s), etc)
0
Independent Software Vendors: We Want Your Opinion

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:n0thing
ID: 2006655
No ... I haven't seen any hidden feature in those commands for
AIX, Linux, Solaris, SunOS 4.1.X. If you're looking for security
holes in those command, you won't find one.


0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:ragnar
ID: 2006656
You might note that chmod has a -a flag for use on systems with ACL priveledges.  this flag makes it so that cown does not overrrite ACL's.

your question is extremely general.  possibly you are looking for a specific feature?  don't be surprised if no one can really help you on this, given the vagueness.
0
 

Author Comment

by:mwche2
ID: 2006657
Probably it'll be interesting to know about the possible implications of these commands, such as for breaching security holes, Trojan horses and hacking.
0
 

Expert Comment

by:bombadil
ID: 2006658
Given that, the answer is "no".
0
 
LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
wex earned 100 total points
ID: 2006659
My bet is that you're looking for the so-called "sticky" bits.  You can set these bits on files/executables (e.g. chmod +s <file>) and when they're used they will retain the identity and permissions of the file *creator* not of the file *user*.

In fact, this is one of the biggest security problems with UNIXen since programs are often set to run as user root when they have no need to do so.

I use the sticky bit for group work (mode g+s) so that everyone in my workgroup can read/write a common set of data files.
0

Featured Post

On Demand Webinar - Networking for the Cloud Era

This webinar discusses:
-Common barriers companies experience when moving to the cloud
-How SD-WAN changes the way we look at networks
-Best practices customers should employ moving forward with cloud migration
-What happens behind the scenes of SteelConnect’s one-click button

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

In tuning file systems on the Solaris Operating System, changing some parameters of a file system usually destroys the data on it. For instance, changing the cache segment block size in the volume of a T3 requires that you delete the existing volu…
FreeBSD on EC2 FreeBSD (https://www.freebsd.org) is a robust Unix-like operating system that has been around for many years. FreeBSD is available on Amazon EC2 through Amazon Machine Images (AMIs) provided by FreeBSD developer and security office…
Learn how to get help with Linux/Unix bash shell commands. Use help to read help documents for built in bash shell commands.: Use man to interface with the online reference manuals for shell commands.: Use man to search man pages for unknown command…
This video shows how to set up a shell script to accept a positional parameter when called, pass that to a SQL script, accept the output from the statement back and then manipulate it in the Shell.

752 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question