Solved

Obtain session's IP address

Posted on 1997-08-18
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316 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-21

Platform: NCR Unix 3555

When I access our Unix system through a dial-in line,
my session will be assigned an IP address, is
there a command I can issue to find out the IP address
I'm currently assigned to??
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Question by:mindless
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8 Comments
 

Accepted Solution

by:
imho earned 10 total points
ID: 2006671
Use the command netstat -rn to display the routing table...
you'll see something like

Routing Table:
  Destination           Gateway           Flags  Ref   Use   Interface
-------------------- -------------------- ----- ----- ------ ---------
224.0.0.0            127.0.0.1             UH       0      0  lo0
127.0.0.1            127.0.0.1             UH       0   3088  lo0
168.234.82.0         168.234.82.13         U        2    105  le0
default              168.234.82.1          UG       0    671  

One interface should be ipdpt0 or tun0 or something like that, that is the modem (ppp) interface, the IP address you have been
assigned is the one belonging to that interface (under the
gateway header).


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Author Comment

by:mindless
ID: 2006672

Here's what I got when running "netstat -rn" from my dial-in
session:

Routing tables
Destination          Gateway              Flags    Refcnt Use        Interface
142.205.224          142.205.224.8        U        0      89730541   en4
142.205.180          142.205.180.8        U        0      8921107    en3
142.205.116          142.205.116.8        U        0      0          en2
142.205.98.0         142.205.98.9         U        0      11923103   en0
142.205.98.0         142.205.98.10        U        0      0          en5
142.205.12           142.205.12.8         U        0      29665263   en1
default              142.205.98.1         UG       0      2650630    en0
127.0.0.1            127.0.0.1            UH       0      10         lo0      

When I said "dial-in", it was actually a dial-in and connect to
the company's LAN first, then telnet to the Unix box.  Would that
make a different?? Is that why I didn't see any lines from above
indicating "modem"??  Any way to determine which one is
my IP address??

0
 

Expert Comment

by:imho
ID: 2006673
which IP address you want to know? Are you dialing in from a Unix box or from a Windows machine? Are you connecting to a Unix Box or to a Win system?
0
 

Expert Comment

by:imho
ID: 2006674
which IP address you want to know? Are you dialing in from a Unix box or from a Windows machine? Are you connecting to a Unix Box or to a Win system?
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Author Comment

by:mindless
ID: 2006675
I'm dialing in from a Win95 machine to the company's
network, once connected to the LAN, I then
issue "telnet 123.456.78.90" to logon to that Unix
server.  Since I'm trying to use xterm via a dial-in line, I'll
need to obtain the dynamic IP address assigned
to this particular session in order to set the
DISPLAY value.  
0
 

Expert Comment

by:imho
ID: 2006676
Then you should issue the netstat command at the Win95 box. I think it should tell you something similar to what the Unix box does.  I'll try it later, but for now just open a ms-dos command window and try the command. Good luck.

Regards,

imho
0
 

Author Comment

by:mindless
ID: 2006677

I tried to run the command from Win95 MS-DOS prompt after
got connected but nothing got returned,
0
 

Expert Comment

by:imho
ID: 2006678
Try the following:
  telnet to the unix box as usual, then:

$ last | head

you should be currently logged in and it should show where you're comming from. If a name appears and not an ip address, you can use:

$ nslookup host.domain.name

 to find out the IP address.

Regards,

imho

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