Parsing and separating the command line

Yeah, this is supposed to be an easy task, but I'm having difficulties. This is a Windows program, so the command line doesn't get automatically parsed like it does in DOS programs. here's the code I have so far:

char *pdest;
int result;
int Spc = ' ';
char *Find;
pdest = strchr(szCmdLine, Spc);
result = pdest - szCmdLine + 1;

szCmdLine is a char * that contains the command line. so far I have   result   storing the position of a space, but what I need now is to store the characters up to the space into a char * and the characters after the space into another char *. I haven't found the substring functions that would be equivalent to Visual Basic's Left(string, length), Right(string, length), and Mid(string, start, length). I'm looking for a code snippet that would accomplish this stuff in C++
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mnicholsAsked:
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md041797Commented:
You need strtok.

#include <string.h>
char *strtok(char *s1, const char *s2);
wchar_t *wcstok(wchar_t *s1, const wchar_t *s2);
char far * far _fstrtok(char far *s1, const char far *s2)

#include <mbstring.h>
unsigned char *_mbstok(unsigned char *s1, const unsigned char *s2);

Description

Searches one string for tokens, which are separated by delimiters defined in a second string.
strtok considers the string s1 to consist of a sequence of zero or more text tokens, separated by spans of one or more characters from the separator string s2.
The first call to strtok returns a pointer to the first character of the first token in s1 and writes a null character into s1 immediately following the returned token. Subsequent calls with null for the first argument will work through the string s1 in this way, until no tokens remain.

The separator string, s2, can be different from call to call.

Note:      Calls to strtok cannot be nested with a function call that also uses strtok. Doing so will causes an endless loop.

Return Value

strtok returns a pointer to the token found in s1. A NULL pointer is returned when there are no more tokens.
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nigel5Commented:
If you are using Visual C++ (at least), __argv, and __argc can be used where you would normally use the main(int, char*[]).

(double underscore)
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mnicholsAuthor Commented:
Actually, this comment is for nigel5...
I thought that argv and argc were only applicable to Win32 console programs. I'm making a Win32 application, with a WinMain function instead of a Main function...
-- Matt
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md041797Commented:
You can use GetCommandLine, as well as argv in Win32.
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