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How to make old AS/400 SCSI disk work ?

Posted on 1997-08-22
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Last Modified: 2008-03-10
I just unplug two SCSI (I or II ?) hard disk (980 Mb) from
an old IBM AS/400 machine, I tried to connect it with my
Adaptec 2940UW SCSI controller and boot up the linux.
Both controller BIOS and Linux do detect the hard drive as
...but Linux give me a message "520 sector size, unsupport"
and delete that disk entry, why?

aslo, when I go into SCSI BIOS setup, and tried to verify
the disk by using the disk utility....it has a error message
"unable to sense key"....

Can someone give me some recommendation ?
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Question by:tlee1
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Expert Comment

by:jeffa072897
ID: 1626612
Have you checked, rechecked, and checked again the termination?
The 2940UW(because it handles wide and narrow SCSI) can drive you nuts on termination. If your other drive(s) are wide you have to disable the low termination on the controller and make sure ohe end drive on the SCSI 1 cain is terminated. This is documented in the Adaptec manual fairly clear.
Have you done the same with the SCSI ID's for duplicate addressing?
Have you verified that there is only 1 terminated drive(presuming these are all internal drives)?
Try lowering the transfer rate in the BIOS setup for these drives. I think that's why you have the sense key errors.
The Adaptec controller also had a "plug and play" option in the bios for configuring the drives - shut it off. Linux will ultimate thank you for it.

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Accepted Solution

by:
dhaun earned 200 total points
ID: 1626613
The AS/400's OS requires SCSI drives to use a sector size of 520
bytes, like the error message said. Linux (and most everything
else) wants a sector size of 512 bytes. It might be possible to
reformat the drive with a different sector size. Try
http://index.storsys.ibm.com/hddtech/scsi/utility/SCSIMD10.EXE
You'll need to load a DOS ASPI driver first.

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