slide show

I am trying to figure out how to put a slidshow on my webpage.  I have about 40 images that I would like to make a slideshow presentation of.  I would like to be able to adjust the duration each slide is up and also be able to stop the show.  I was thinking the best way is with Java.

What I currently have is just meta tags causing a new html file(one for each image) to be read in every 5 seconds.  With this method I can not stop or adjust the duration.  Is there a way with html to add a stop and play button?
micahAsked:
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jshamlinCommented:
In HTML, there's no way to interrupt or alter the reloading of pages using META tags (I'm guessing that's what you're doing now) - using the browser's "STOP" button stops the load, but the seconds to reload keep ticking (in some browsers, in others that stops too) and "reload" will reset the time.  Not much control at all.

An animated GIF would be another simple alternative - but you can't alter the intervals programatically (and GIF format isn't very good if the images are photos), so it doesn't quite fit your needs.

You're still left with a few options: Java, JavaScript, or a plug-in technology like Shockwave.

I usually rail against Shockwave, but for this sort of interactive multimedia, I think it may be your best option.  'Course that means buying Macromedia Director of Flash (the latter, much cheaper than the former, would probably suffice).  There may be other, more affordable plug-in technologies with similar capabilites that I don't know about (having dropped the cash for Director, I don't spend much time looking around).

Java would be more universal - but the problem will be load time - every one of those 40 images would have to pre-load in memory, so you'd be looking at a pretty big applet.  Also, there may or may not be a "pre-written" applet (check http://www.gamelan.com for freeware/shareware applets), so you might still have to buy a Java compiler and learn the language.

Last of the three, JavaScript, is probably the easiest and cheapest solution - but using it will constrain your audience to Netscape users.  I think with some creative coding and FRAMES, you could get around the image[] object and include IE users as well, but it would still require frames-capability.

Anyhoo - any one of those solutions should work, but you'll need to consider your specific budget, expertise, and audience to decide which to employ.
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