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Second IDE hard drive setup problems

Posted on 1997-08-29
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
I am having trouble with a second hard disk drive that I installed.

I have installed a second hard drive in my system (Western Digital 2.0G
IDE drive).  Both my drives are hooked into the same PCI IDE channel on
my motherboard, which is an AMD 486 133 MHz machine.

When I run "Add Hardware" Wizard, Win95 does not detect the new drive
(was it supposed to?).  The drive works flawlessly in native DOS and is
recognized by the BIOS, so there are no physical errors or problems with
the drive.  The drive is set up as an Extended DOS drive with one
logical partition and not as a Primary Dos partition ( I
am trying to get a C: and a D: drive under Win95,  C being my first hard
drive and D being my newly installed second drive)

The strange thing is that it appears as an unformatted D: drive in the
"My Computer" folder when I access it.  Ok, so I format the drive by
using the "Format..." command when I right click on the drive.  Good.
Now I save a few files on the drive.  Good again.

I shutdown Win95, restart it, and Win95 now states that the drive cannot
be accessed.  On some occasions, Win95 doesn't even see the new drive at
all.  If I do the Format/Save Files dance, it now works, but the
restarting of Win95 always results in Win95 not recognizing my drive or
stating that the drive is not formatted.  I thought that there may be a
problem with the drive itself, but as I stated before, I tested the
drive under native DOS, and it works perfectly if I switch the computer
on and off.  Yes, I scanned for bad sectors, cylinders, the whole works.

What's going on??? Should some value or something have been written to
the registry, telling Win95 about my new drive?  It's wierd that the
drive works if I do a format and don't restart Win95.

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Question by:pmac1
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Accepted Solution

by:
j2 earned 50 total points
ID: 1750270
No, add hardware is no tsupposed to recognize a drive.

here is what you do:

1. Jumper the driveS for master/slave accordingly, in MOST cases the MASTER has to be rejumpered aswell when a new slave gets present.

2. Detect the drives in BIOS, make SURE you select the right translation (usually indicated by the BIOS) you must use LBA mode for drives >528MB in size

3. Boot windows, run FDISK and creat a partition on the disk

4. Exit fdisk and reboot.

5. format the drive

If this doesnt work, something is wrong with your system
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Expert Comment

by:compmech
ID: 1750271
incorrect: the old W95 verison will still recognize the partion, but only up to 1.99 GB, however the FS will not be trashed upon reboot.
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LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:j2
ID: 1750272
I have tried all of the above.  The disk is in LBA mode.  The first disk C: is an old 540M Western Dig. 2540.  This disk has no problems.  I may have to wipe and re-install Win95 with the new disk attached and see how that works.


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Author Comment

by:pmac1
ID: 1750273
are you SURE that the master drive is configured as "Master with slave present" and NOT just "master"?
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